From £14,451
Greener version of likeable i30 is hard to knock

Our Verdict

Hyundai i30 Turbo

Can the second-generation Hyundai i30 challenge for class honours?

What is it?

This is a new, greener version of Hyundai’s European-built i30 hatchback, featuring a stop-start system and ‘Blue Drive’ sub-branding.

It was unveiled at the Geneva motor show last month, and goes on sale in the autumn. The newly developed ISG (for Integrated Stop and Go) system is made by Bosch, and will initially be fitted to the 1.4 and 1.6 petrol versions of the i30.

It’s been designed to ensure that the engine restarts particularly quickly, and also comes with an intelligent alternator that performs most of its charging duties when the car is coasting or braking to further save fuel. On the 1.6 litre petrol these systems reduce CO2 emissions by seven per cent to 142g/km, a 10g/km gain on the standard car.

What’s it like?

Identical to a stock i30, except that the engine cuts off when you push the gearlever into neutral and are doing less than 2.5mph. The switch-off is seamless – if you have the radio up loud you may not even notice that the engine has shut down – and the motor fires up again well before you’ve fully sunk the clutch, and without any of the transverse engine shake that afflicts the stop-start Mini.

The result is pretty unobtrusive fuel saving around town. The intelligent alternator allows the system to operate at temperatures lower than the Mini’s, which will not switch the engine off in sub-zero conditions, further saving fuel.

Should I buy one?

It’s a shame that Hyundai is not yet offering Blue Drive stop-start on its diesel engines – the 1.6 CRD already sits at a fairly low 125g/km, which would presumably drop below the 120g/km threshold with this hardware installed.

As it is, the 1.6 petrol’s emissions drop from 152g/km to 142g/km is useful, but does not allow the i30 to sit among the low-emission front-runners in its class. Nevertheless, fuel-saving stop-start technology is welcome on any model.

As to the i30 itself, we already rate this Hyundai quite highly as a well-priced alternative in the Ford Focus class, and its greater efficiency can only help.

Join the debate

Comments
3

29 May 2009

How did blue become green?

Why does every eco model have to have 'blue' in the name?

Was it VW's fault with the Bluemotion models?

29 May 2009

EU directive I think - you're not allowed to call things that pollute Green or somesuch idiocy - hence the manufacturers have all agreed on blue as the marketing trigger. It reminds me of tampon adverts...

Bring back steel wheels.

31 May 2009

[quote W124]EU directive I think - you're not allowed to call things that pollute Green or somesuch idiocy - hence the manufacturers have all agreed on blue as the marketing trigger[/quote]

Isn't Skodas version called the Greenline?

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Lamborghini Aventador S
    First Drive
    21 January 2017
    Is an upgrade to 730bhp and the addition of four-wheel steering enough to realise the Aventador's potential?
  • Ford Focus RS Mountune FPM375
    First Drive
    20 January 2017
    Does an official Mountune upgrade of 25bhp and 30lb ft, improve the already rampant and rather magnificent Ford Focus RS?
  • Audi S5 Sportback
    First Drive
    19 January 2017
    The Audi S5 Sportback is more bruising GT than practical sports car, but it makes sense for those wanting a fast executive saloon in coupé get-up
  • First Drive
    18 January 2017
    Despite receiving a cosmetic and mechanical refresh, Lexus's compact executive saloon still fails to provide much driving involvement
  • 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV 5h review
    First Drive
    18 January 2017
    Big-selling plug-in SUV gets a light refresh in the face of new challengers to offer decent economy but only average driving dynamics