From £7,716
Worth the small price premium if you want more refinement from your i10

Our Verdict

Hyundai i10 2008-2013
The Hyundai i10 can still cut it against the chic new Volkswagen Up

The Hyundai i10 offers bags of kit at a keen price, but needs more character

  • First Drive

    Hyundai i10 Blue

    Hyundai i10 Blue is an appealing high-value proposition
  • First Drive

    Hyundai i10 1.2 Style

    Worth the small price premium if you want more refinement from your i10
17 September 2008

What is it?

A more powerful version of the i10, featuring a new 1.2-litre engine. The 16-valve all-alloy motor puts out 77bhp and 87lb ft of torque – 12bhp and 14lb ft more than the base 1.1 i10.

Those might seem like minor changes, but the rise in output is enough to endow the i10 1.2 with a 2.8 second faster 0-62mph time than its smaller-engined sister, although the 12.8 seconds it takes for the benchmark is hardly turning it into a rocketship.

More importantly, the increase in engine size has had no effect on CO2 emissions or economy, which remain the same as the 1.1-litre at 119g/km and 56.5mpg.

Our test car came in range-topping ‘Style’ trim, which includes everything from heated seats and a leather steering wheel to an MP3 connection.

What’s it like?

The true benefit of picking the 1.2-litre i10 is not its performance figures, rather its dramatically improved refinement.

At idle you can barely hear the engine, and although it starts rasping under full throttle, it’s always a civilised performer.

Around town the 1.2-litre motor has a free-revving, punchy nature that allows you to make the most of the i10’s slick gearchange and well-weighted steering.

Venture onto the motorway and the benefits of the bigger engine are apparent in terms of both reduced engine noise when cruising, but also a welcome boost in performance.

It’s still far from being rapid, though, and overtaking requires anticipation – you need to plan your move before pulling out into faster moving traffic.

The 1.1-litre i10 is already one of our favourite city cars, and the new 1.2-litre option is competitively priced and makes it feel more grown-up.

Should I buy one?

Absolutely. If you’re in the market for a cheap, efficient and comfortable city car any i10 is a great choice. And as the cheapest 1.2 model costs just £200 more than the equivalent 1.1, it’s a no-brainer.

 

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Citroën C4 Grand Picasso
    First Drive
    26 August 2016
    The Citroën Grand C4 Picasso gets tweaked styling, improved tech and new personalisation options to keep it ahead of rivals
  • Car review
    26 August 2016
    Wolfsburg celebrates the GTI’s 40th with its most extreme version yet
  • Kia Optima Sportwagon
    First Drive
    25 August 2016
    New Kia estate looks the part, has good space and handles tidily, but its engine's flexibility and refinement let it down
  •  Kia Optima PHEV
    First Drive
    25 August 2016
    Plug-in hybrid Optima is a practical, tax-efficient PHEV that undercuts rivals and fulfils its main remit well, but keen drivers need not apply
  • Lamborghini Huracán LP610-4 Spyder
    First Drive
    24 August 2016
    Awful driving position aside, drop-top Huracán handles UK roads well. It's more dynamically rounded than its rangemates, but lacks rivals' handling bite