If you want to minimise your outlay and maximise your return, a modestly dressed CR-V would seem the way forward. All versions come with a three-year, 90,000-mile warranty with servicing according to how you drive it.

Fuel consumption varies from a really rather impressive 62.8mpg for the 1.6-litre diesel to the somewhat disastrous 37.7mpg of the 2.0-litre, all-wheel-drive petrol model with an automatic transmission that offers inferior performance to every other model in the range, 1.6-litre diesel included.

Matt Prior

Matt Prior

Road test editor
On CO2 the CR-V is competitive, but far from class leading

So unless you’re a one-legged man or woman with a pathological aversion to diesel, it’s very hard indeed to see why you’d bother. A standard 4WD 2.2-litre diesel manages just over 50mpg, a similar result to that achieved by the likes of the Toyota RAV4 and Kia Sportage when equipped with similar engines.

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