Porsche is set to ramp up the already potent power output of the 911 Turbo to about 525bhp
20 February 2012

These are the latest winter spy pictures of the all-new Porsche 911 Turbo. Porsche is set to ramp up the already potent power output, crushing in-gear performance and overall economy of the current model through the adoption of a new tri-turbo system for its existing 3.8-litre, horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine.

The firm plans to replace the twin-turbo set-up of today’s 911 Turbo with a complex triple-turbo induction process similar to that employed by BMW M’s new six-cylinder diesel-powered M550d xDrive and X5 and X6 xDrive50d models.

Porsche’s new system is undergoing its final phase of development in the back of engineering prototypes of the new top-of-the-line 991.

As revealed in a series of recent patent applications made by the German car maker, the Porsche system uses three individual turbochargers. One smaller unit is mounted close to the engine to boost low-end response together with two larger ones similar to the Borg Warner units in use today.

As well as increasing overall power and providing a more linear delivery at the lower end of the rev range, the new induction process is also claimed to improve efficiency — something well placed Weissach sources suggest will bring about significant fuel savings.

Details remain scarce, but power for the new 911 Turbo, the coupé version of which is due out early next year, looks set to climb from 495bhp to somewhere in the region of 525bhp — or the same as that of today’s 911 Turbo S. At the same time, combined average fuel economy and CO2 emissions are expected to beat the existing model’s 24.4mpg and 272g/km.

As well as appearing in the 911 Turbo, the new tri-turbo system is also earmarked for the next-generation 911 GT2 and the successor to the GT2 RS.

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Comments
39

27 January 2012

It certainly allows Porsche to extract a little more power from the current engine structure.

Without a serious re-working, this version of the current flat six must be pretty much at the limits of it's development potential.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

27 January 2012

[quote TegTypeR]Without a serious re-working, this version of the current flat six must be pretty much at the limits of it's development potential.[/quote] Not at all, the GT2 RS makes 612bhp.

27 January 2012

[quote The Special One]

[quote TegTypeR]Without a serious re-working, this version of the current flat six must be pretty much at the limits of it's development potential.[/quote] Not at all, the GT2 RS makes 612bhp.

[/quote]

For someone who normally dislikes Porsche products so much, you seem to be fairly clued up! ;-))

Must admit, should have qualified it a bit better. As a run of the mill, relatively mass production engine. The GT2RS uses some pretty specialist bits.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

27 January 2012

The timing of this announcement is excellent - allow BMW one news cycle for their tri-turbo, because they got there first, then announce plans (rather than actual specs) for yours and steal the tri-turbo limelight. Marketing director/executive/vp earned their bonus today.

27 January 2012

[quote TegTypeR][quote The Special One]

[quote TegTypeR]Without a serious re-working, this version of the current flat six must be pretty much at the limits of it's development potential.[/quote] Not at all, the GT2 RS makes 612bhp.

[/quote]

For someone who normally dislikes Porsche products so much, you seem to be fairly clued up! ;-))

Must admit, should have qualified it a bit better. As a run of the mill, relatively mass production engine. The GT2RS uses some pretty specialist bits.

[/quote]

Like, er, a completely different engine, at least it is completely different in any GT2RS yet seen. The 997 GT2RS has the Mezger engine: the new 3.8 991 turbo is based on the more recent generation of engine.

There may of course at some point in the future be a new 991 GT2RS using the same basic engine as this newly announced turbo, but Porsche hasn't released any information on that yet.

27 January 2012

[quote Submariner Redux]

Like, er, a completely different engine, at least it is completely different in any GT2RS yet seen. The 997 GT2RS has the Mezger engine: the new 3.8 991 turbo is based on the more recent generation of engine.

There may of course at some point in the future be a new 991 GT2RS using the same basic engine as this newly announced turbo, but Porsche hasn't released any information on that yet.

[/quote]

I bow to your greater knowledge!

I knew previous generations of turbo used the same engine structure as the GT2 and GT3, that being the one derived from the motorsport developed GT1 (hence why they didn't suffer the RMS issues of the NA engines) but I wasn't aware the new turbo used a completely different unit.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

DKW

27 January 2012

The modest power increase suggests Porsche will be pursuing the 'driveability' trend started with the current gen turbo, which in standard tune very unusually had a specific power output reduced from it's predecessor in order to reduce lag.

27 January 2012

[quote TegTypeR]I knew previous generations of turbo used the same engine structure as the GT2 and GT3, that being the one derived from the motorsport developed GT1 (hence why they didn't suffer the RMS issues of the NA engines) but I wasn't aware the new turbo used a completely different unit.[/quote]

Yep: the word is that all 991 models, including the Turbo, use the new generation engines. Incidentally, the generation 2 997 Turbo (the ones following the intro of the PDK box and DFI engines into the 997 range) also lost the Mezger engine, leaving only the GT3 and GT2 as Mezger cars in the final years of the 997.

27 January 2012

I always thought that the 996.1 GT3 the one with 360bhp and 3600cc was the only one with the 911GT1 engine... all the others had 3596cc (996) or 3614 (997) up until the GT2RS who used again the 3600cc unit.

The same applies with the 3.8, 3797cc and 3824cc the first for the GT3 the other for the Carrera S.

And yes I like numbers!

27 January 2012

Am I the only one that finds this depressing?

Almost in the same week that Porsche kills off the prospect of smaller, cheaper flat 4 sports car, they announce that they are going to build an even faster 911 turbo. Why, was the last one not fast enough?

I speak as a Porsche fan and owner, but it seems to me that they are heading up a blind alley by making ever faster and faster cars that are virtually unuseable given modern legislation. I know the answer is that they will sell them all and make a shed load of cash, but I fear the day will come when suddenly these pointlessly fast cars suddenly fall from fashion, and Porsche will be left with nothing sensible at the bottom of the market to cushion the blow. Porsche blow hard about their heritage, which is the small, light, agile sports car, yet are in danger of forgetting it completely.

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