Range-extender to cost almost 43,000 euros - but Vauxhall version should be cheaper

Opel's version of the Chevrolet Volt will cost considerably more than the American-market model when it goes on sale before the end of 2011, it has emerged.

Opel has today announced a price of 42,900 euros for the Ampera, the version of the Volt that will be sold by the German brand and its UK partner, Vauxhall. That equates to more than $58,000, considerably more than the $41,000 base price (before state taxes) of the Volt.

That figure could result in the Vauxhall Ampera costing north of £40k, considerably more than the figure originally expected for the car.

However, a Vauxhall source insisted that the firm would "announce its own price" for the Ampera before the end of this year, an indication that British buyers may have to pay less for the model, even before the UK government's £5000 eco-vehicle grant.

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26

11 November 2010

"...even before the UK government's £5000 eco-vehicle grant..."

Assuming there is any of the allocated money left when GM belatedly get this EV (modified hybrid?) on the road

11 November 2010

The government should introduce a new rule something along the lines of environmental subsidy only available to sub £25k vehicles. I thought the idea of a subsidy was to encourage people to buy these vehicles? Isn't it wise to make incentives to the masses rather than the privileged few?

11 November 2010

UK to European cars often appear to assume about 1.2 euro to the pound, so i suspect a UK price of £35,000 -£36,000. Probably £34,999 so with the subsidy its still under £30,000. Still way too expensive, but i doubt they want to sell too many

11 November 2010

This green ornament is a rip off.

11 November 2010

Do we have any idea what the Chevrolet-badged versions will cost? My money is on them being cheaper than the Vauxhall version.

11 November 2010

[quote evanstim]Do we have any idea what the Chevrolet-badged versions will cost? My money is on them being cheaper than the Vauxhall version.[/quote] The Volt lists at US$41k, and is apparently something like US$33k after including the credit from the US government incentive scheme. I've no idea whether there are any further taxes to add to that price.

11 November 2010

My Guess is that the Chevy will be reasonably cheaper than the Vauxhall version. I think GM is trying to take Vauxhall a bit more upmarket with Chevrolet taking the Value range.

11 November 2010

About £40k for an Ampera? You could have a BMW 520d Touring and £10k change or go for the 530d for £40k. Even if the governments gives every buyer £5k of our money I cannot see GM shifting many of these cars in Europe or UK.

12 November 2010

[quote ronmcdonald]The government should introduce a new rule something along the lines of environmental subsidy only available to sub £25k vehicles. I thought the idea of a subsidy was to encourage people to buy these vehicles? Isn't it wise to make incentives to the masses rather than the privileged few?[/quote]

Good point, as is the suggestion in a later post that for the same money you could have a conventionally powered, luxury estate and 10 grand in change.

The early reports on the real world enonomy are not great, it seems to be most at home in and around town or in queuing traffic. It seems to be at a disadvantage compared to a conventionally powered, similar sized car in terms of motorway economy and the potential savings around town compared to a smaller car are totally overshadowed by the initial purchase cost.

On a more positive note, the natural market for it would seem to be China. Still a vast and rapidly developing market in terms of new car sales, rich in rare earth minerals but lacking in fossil fuel resources. They have lots of traffic jams too.

Lets hope they buy enough of them to justify the developments in battery technology and lower the purchase cost enough for it to become a more realistic proposition for us. Maybe that's been GM's plan all along.

12 November 2010

Vehicles of any hue need power to sit in queuing traffic, especially in winter, or at night, or both. The first manufacturer to produce an Ampera-style vehicle at an affordable price (albeit a loss-leading one) will surely claim the high ground in that field, in the same way that Toyota did in the hybrid field with its accessibly priced Prius. GM appears too keen to recoup its costs too quickly. This approach might taint them in the medium term. If someone puts out a direct competitor at £20-£25k the Ampera runs the risk of sinking without trace.

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