New estate, roadster and X-Type all announced as future models in Tata's annual report

Jaguar Land Rover’s parent firm Tata Motors has admitted it is considering plans to add three new models to Jaguar’s range: an X-Type replacement, an XF estate and a new XE baby roadster.

Writing to shareholders in the firm’s annual report, Tata chairman Ratan Tata hinted at the models alongside plans to overhaul Land Rover’s entire range, while also inferring JLR production could be shifted to China or India to respond to increased demand in those markets.

See Autocar's renderings of the Jaguar XE and Jaguar XF estate

Tata said he was “considering widening the Jaguar product range of by introducing a station wagon, a new entry-level Jaguar, and a new roadster”.

The long-rumoured XE baby roadster would slot in below the XK, while the new entry-level model would give Jaguar a replacement to the now discontinued X-Type to rival the BMW 3-series. The XF estate is tipped to launch in 2012 to coincide with the XF’s facelift.

Read more on the new Jaguar models

Tata noted that market conditions had been improving; JLR’s sales have been positive for the first two quarters of the year. He also said new JLR products, including the new XJ and Range Rover models, had been well received by markets, providing a big boost to sales after enduring a torrid end to 2008/start to 2009.

“The company has enormous talent, capabilities and skills, in addition to an impressive development of product and process technologies,” said Tata. “These will enable the company to achieve a more prominent position in the international automobile marketplace in the coming years.”

Read more JLR's recent sales success

Tata said Land Rover’s immediate challenge was to produce enough vehicles to cope with a surge in demand, before “progressively introducing fuel-efficient stop-start and hybrid vehicles”.

“Work is underway to revamp and refresh the entire model range,” he added.

Tata also hinted that JLR production could be partially shifted to India or China to increase profitability in markets where there had been a strong increase in demand.

“China has emerged as the third-largest global market for Land Rover/Range Rover and studies are underway to consider options to increase market penetration in China, India and other developing markets,” he said.

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Comments
56

4 August 2010

It's a great idea to replace the X-Type with something more in line with the current range. Some people seem to think that having smaller cars in the range means giving up on the 'premium' market but this is just nonsense. Both Audi and BMW produce compact execs and small hatchbacks with lowly engines and they're still considered 'premium'. An X-Type replacement doesn't have to appeal to the masses anyway, like a bottom of the range 3-er does, but not having one would be a mistake.

Good to see the XF wagon is on it's way at last. Took it's time. Again, a car that would widen the appeal of the brand without diluting it's upmarket credentials. I still think an XF 2 door coupe would be an easy way to make more profit from the platform. It could slot in between the forthcoming XE and the XK. Maybe with the revamp?

I read in another magazine that they are planning a LWB XF too, primarily for China.

5 August 2010

I can see JLR growing the Range Rover and Jaguar range's. But I do wonder where they go from here with Land Rover. Do they take on Toyota and co and built a robust 4x4 only brand that is designed for the developing world or do they continue as is? Personally I think Land Rover should = Premium utility/ adventure in the developed world. And good value utility 4x4's everywhere else. They should simply fit more upmarket components here and functional components in place like India. Oh and one reason to do utility would be to compete with the Ford F150 in the US...

5 August 2010

[quote TStag] I do wonder where they go from here with Land Rover.[/quote]

I think Land Rover is a confused brand at the moment. THey used to be no nonsense, tough go anywhere vehicles. Slowly but surely they have turned into luxury road based vehicles for well heeled folk.

I had a mate who ran discoveries for ages, only a moth or so ago he went in to change again for the new model and he was aghast at the cost. He's now looking at the Shogun, Grand Cherokee etc as they offer off road ability and decent comfort levels for a decent price. Land Rover is now competing against itself with Range Rover. THey have three cars which more or less are in exactly the same segment, the Luxury large off roader - the Range Rover, THe RR SPort and the Disco. THe current discovery needs to be a bit less luxurious in my opinion. Not that it isnt a great vehicle which I would certainly prefer over say an X5 or Q7, but its gone too upmarket.

5 August 2010

I think its a great move for Jaguar. Like the other comments, I am confused with the Land Rover brand at the moment - it seems to have moved away from where it used to be!

Surely its time to seperate properly the Land Rover and Range Rover branding - maybe due to the cost bring the discovery in the Range Rover Brand, and let Land Rover go back to making the everyday workhorses that it built its reputation on - keep the price down, but the reliability and long life build quality as it has always been. Maybe in some respects they have not been class leaders, but they have always done the job they were built for, and seem pretty bullet proof. Carry this on, by all means develop the range, but don't take it upmarket - leave that to the Rangie boys.

To live is to drive

5 August 2010

Good to hear about development plans for Jaguar at last. The XF estate is crucial and long overdue. I think they should milk the current platform for all they can get and release a 2 door version too. A decent rwd alternative to the A5 would be fantastic. All this to come with the revamp which would hopefully sort out that unfortunate headlight mistake.

The X Type replacement is also absolutely necessary- it doesn't have to come with 1.6 engines and poverty spec like most 3-ers or A4's so it could position itself at the top end of the compact exec market. The conquest potential for a compact with XF-ish styling must be enormous.

The XE has been on the cards forever hasn't it? It would be fantastic to have a Boxster/Z4 competitor after all these years. An XF coupe would sit between the XE and the XK.

I don't think they need to go much further than that. Maybe a bit of AWD sprinkled across the range, particularly the wagons? The current desire by German manufacturers to cover all bases with a single brand is a bit foolish. Merc doesn't need to produce small fwd hatches when it has the Smart brand and Jaguar certainly shouldn't try and compete in these markets.

As far as Land Rover is concerned, I agree with previous posts that maybe Range Rover should be separated properly from Land Rover so that LR can be brought back down to earth a bit. Land Rover should be tough and chunky and iconic. Range Rover could then be left to cater for footballers and their wives.

5 August 2010

No one here seems concerned about the inference that production may shift to Asia. Is that simply because such a move must be inevitable, or because from an employment perspective the thought that it may do so is just so completely awful?

5 August 2010

[quote Liam F]No one here seems concerned about the inference that production may shift to Asia. Is that simply because such a move must be inevitable, or because from an employment perspective the thought that it may do so is just so completely awful?[/quote]

I think there has been a concern that this might happen at some stage since TATA took ownership. I personally believe that Jaguars should be made in England but am less concerned about Land Rovers being built abroad. No-one gives a monkeys anymore that Mercs & BMW's are made all over the place. If production in India is supplementary and intended for local supply then that is something that can probably be accepted.

SDR

5 August 2010

[quote Liam F]No one here seems concerned about the inference that production may shift to Asia. Is that simply because such a move must be inevitable, or because from an employment perspective the thought that it may do so is just so completely awful?[/quote]

I hope and expect that Mr Tata would be looking to establish additional production facilities in China or India rather than moving all production out of the UK - that makes perfect sense given that the facilities would be serving two different types of market with two different mindsets and expectations.

That said, even if UK production did one day take a reduced role (I really don't see it disappearing, nor do I see high skill high value R&D leaving the UK) I couldn't help but ask 'so what was the better alternative?'. Under Ford's direction these companies were going nowhere fast, Jaguar seemed to be stuck in 1958 and LR had a product range that was increasingly irrelevant. I'm really impressed with the way Mr Tata is taking JLR forward, my expectations have been surpassed. The product range of Jaguar is now light years ahead of where it was a few years ago with apparently even better to come, and I am optimistic LR will develop into something more clearly defined and relevant as they move forward.

I don't think there is any credible evidence that JLR is suffering under 'eastern ownership' - quite the reverse, its current owners have the vision to allow it to flourish. All European manufacturers who want to compete in the world's fastest growing markets are having to ask the same difficult but necessary questions about manufacturing facilities - JLR would have to face these same issues if they were owned by a European or American - but it's arguable that being owned by an Indian guy they may come up with better answers due to superior local knowledge. I believe there is a good understanding at Tata that 'Britishness' is part of the JLR brand value and I imagine they will not do anything to undermine that. Call me naive if you like, but I would just say I'm not being cynical. JLR was going nowhere, now it's going somewhere, and that can only be a good thing.

Oh and by the way my last name is not Tata, nor do I have even a small shrine to the great man in my bedroom. I just think he's doing a good job, better than any alternative was likely to do, and I'm prepared to trust him to do the right thing in the absence of any objective reason not to do so.


5 August 2010

Does anybody know if they have a Joint Venture partner already in China? I would assume they will move production/additinal production into China, as they must get hit pretty hard on the large import tax. That said they would then have to share the profits with the JV, and you can't do business there without a local partner.

5 August 2010

[quote Geetee40]Does anybody know if they have a Joint Venture partner already in China? I would assume they will move production/additinal production into China, as they must get hit pretty hard on the large import tax.[/quote]

Another reason to consider the possibility of local manufacture? LWB XF's built in India specifically for Indian and Chinese markets might outweigh the taxation. So long as they don't try and flog them in Europe at £50k a piece...

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