Refreshed styling inside and put, plus dynamic changes, for MPV that's been axed from the UK

Dodge has launched a facelifted Journey for 2011 – but the model won’t be coming to the UK after Dodge was axed from these shores by parent firm Fiat.

The revised models get some subtle styling changes including new front and rear bumpers, a revised front grille, new LED rear lights and a new set of 19-inch alloy wheels.

See the official pics of the Dodge Journey facelift

Interior upgrades include a new instrument cluster, a new dashboard, a new steering wheel, new seats and softer materials for the centre console and armests.

Engine options will include a new 3.5-litre V6 engine with 287bhp 260lbt, increases of 48bhp and 28lb ft over the 3.6-litre Pentastar V6 engine it replaces.

Read more on Dodge being axed from the UK

Dynamic tweaks include more responsive handling, a new steering system, improved tyres and a retuned suspension swt-up.

Sales will start later this year for customers in the US ahead of the first deliveries in early 2011. Dodge was finally axed in the UK last month when the Journey was deleted from price lists following poor sales, a feat also suffered earlier this year by Dodge’s Nitro and Caliber models.

See all the latest Dodge Journey reviews, news and video

Join the debate

Comments
9

21 October 2010

I think this car sums up all that is odd about the yanks and their automotive landscape.

We had this car in the UK ... with a 130bhp TD engine. They have a 280bhp V6. The Dodge Sprinter (Merc Sprinter with different badge) was sold in the US with a 5 cylinder TD engine with 140hp .... it competes against the E-Class van from Ford etc with engines up to 300hp (6.8L V10) .... the Sprinter is in fact bigger in terms of space.

The silliest thing of all is that the yanks think they need these massive engines whilst stuck in a traffic jam on the interstate. Madness.

21 October 2010

[quote Cheltenhamshire]

I think this car sums up all that is odd about the yanks and their automotive landscape.

We had this car in the UK ... with a 130bhp TD engine. They have a 280bhp V6

[/quote]

I would guess that if you drove the version with the VW Diesel and then drove the version with the new Pentastar V6. You probably wouldnt find it so odd....

They have cheap fuel, they get to have nice big engines that don't have to be so focussed on Economy. Its the same all over the world, China, the US, Australia, Dubai etc etc, All these countries have cheap fuel and so drive larger engined vehicles. If we had cheap fuel, it would be the same here, you can bet that if fuel wasnt so expensive, I would trade my V6 diesel for a V8 petrol in a heartbeat. Unfortunately, our fuel is so expensive that we are forced into weedy engined vehicles in the mostpart that are focused on economy. In the US, less than a V6 is considered a bit of an economy engine.

But on the subject of the Journey, I'm liking the new interior. I really don't understand why now that They are pumping out some good vehicles with good quality interiors, they suddenly decide that we can't have them when they were more than happy to let us have the not as good Mercedes generation cars. And has Dodge really been axed from the UK? The website is still up and running and our local dealer has a few 60 plate Journeys. Besides, the Journey will actually be coming to the UK, but just with a Fiat Badge as Fiat will be selling the Journey under their nameplate.

This Journey definately looks way better than say a VW Touran, Vauxhall Zafira or Toyota Verso....

21 October 2010

[quote Cheltenhamshire]

I think this car sums up all that is odd about the yanks and their automotive landscape.

We had this car in the UK ... with a 130bhp TD engine. They have a 280bhp V6. The Dodge Sprinter (Merc Sprinter with different badge) was sold in the US with a 5 cylinder TD engine with 140hp .... it competes against the E-Class van from Ford etc with engines up to 300hp (6.8L V10) .... the Sprinter is in fact bigger in terms of space.

The silliest thing of all is that the yanks think they need these massive engines whilst stuck in a traffic jam on the interstate. Madness.

[/quote]
You do realize that not all of us live in cities or the suburbs with an abundance of traffic, right? Or that not ever roadway in America is full of congestion or stop-n-go traffic, no?

If you go out to places in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Missouri or Texas, you may drive for hours before seeing a traffic light. It's just the nature of things in many states, but particularly in the mid-west. Additionally, it's not only domestic brands like Dodge, Ford or Chevrolet who offer these products with larger displacement V6 engines. Other brands like Honda (Pilot), Toyota (Highlander/RAV4), Nissan (Murano), Kia (Sorrento) and others also offer them as well.

So in a very real sense, Dodge is offering this because other competitors offer it. If you don't, you may deter some consumers, even if they eventually purchase a smaller displacement engine or a 4-cylinder motor.

Also remember that just because an engine is large, doesn't mean it doesn't get decent gasoline mileage. Yes, typically the larger the displacement, the more it will guzzle gas. But there are 6 cylinder engines on the market today that get gas mileage comparable to 4 cylinder engines from only a decade ago; just as there are 4-cylinders today that produce more power than 6 cylinder/larger displacement engines from yesterday.

As for the comparison of the Sprinter and E-Series Van, from what I've seen here (and I could be wrong) they are two different animals and serve different types of customers/applications. The E-Series usally only has the V-10 in 15-passenger extended form only and at times is used for hauling applications (I know some ranchers, farmers, lumberjacks, etc have used them in the past to get to job-sites). In fact, Ford offers this Van with the V-10, cabin and chassis only to aftermarket companies, who will turn them into a kind of "mini-bus" that are used for local community centers, senior citizen transports, hopsitals and church groups. The "normal" version of the E-Series is typically bought by carpenters, plumbers, and other tradesmen. Meanwhile, most of the applications I've seen used for the Sprinter include package/parcel delivery services and the like in urban and suburban areas. Perhaps in such limited use, a smaller engine works best v. hauling people and equipment with an E-Series?

Lastly, consider taxes and government regulations. Our gas tax is considerably cheaper than in most European countries. In addition, we don't tax people on engine displacement like other nations do, which forces automakers to either use expensive technologies or forced induction (turbos/superchargers) to solve power issues to fit under a displacement-tax cap. Since there is more than one way to solve a power problem, some manufacturers would find it more cost effective to simply build a larger engine or stick to an existing V6 engine that produces good power and economy than spend thousands extra to make a smaller engine packed with expensive extras. So for example, you could produce a 2.0L I4 that puts out 260hp with a turbo and expensive electronics or you could build a V6 with similar numbers for thousands less (Added electronics and turbos aren't really cheap to develop or buy from vendors). And when you think about it, since the entire industry is based on costs and sales volume, the cheaper application works since it lowers the transaction price and drives people into showrooms to boos industry sales.

Regardless, getting back to the Journey, I know a few folks who do own a Journey and they don't use it just for family-hauling. One friend purchased this vehicle because he had a trailer he used for camping and snowmobiling. He didn't want something as large as an SUV with a heavy body-on-frame chassis or a thirsty V8. So instead he got a "crossover/MPV" style vehicle to use for this purpose.

Just offering a different perspective. Cheers.

Greetings from New Jersey!

21 October 2010

[quote fhp11]In the US, less than a V6 is considered a bit of an economy engine.[/quote]
This is very true. For good or ill, the percpetion is that 4 cylinder engines are "cheap" and are for "economy cars" only. Historically in the US, economic cars were a HORRID place to spend time. No matter if it came from a European, Japanese or US auotmaker, economy/economic minded cars always had terrible interiros, chintz plastics, mouse-fur seats, hollow sounding doors, etc. They were always referred to as "tin cans" or "$hit boxes", etc. All of this didn't help the percpetion of I4s in years past.

However that perception, thought it still lingers, is now falling away and erroding. This is part because years ago (and by that I mean the 1950s through the 1970s) the ONLY engine you'd want in your car was a V8 and V6s were considered cheap and power-less engines. Then in the 1980s through the 1990s, the V6 essentially became the V8 of years before; that is the V6 was seen as attractive and the V8 found less and less applications in passenger cars (with the exception of sports cars, GT cars, and trucks).

Today in the US, that percpetion continues to change as many I4s on the market put out respectable power and aren't considered "weak" by American standards. Add in the fact that we typically have larger displacement I4s that produce better lower end torque (Toyota has a 2.4L I4 in the Camry and a 2.7L I4 in the Highlander; Nissan has a 2.5L I4 in the Altima; Chevy has a 2.4L I4 in the Malibu, etc) and I4s are slowly reversing this misconception.

Now if we could only get our moron regulators to stop hampering the process so we can have more diesel engines in passenger cars here, we'd be set. Right now only trucks, SUVs, and select German vehicles offer diesels in the US. Chevrolet is supposed to offer the new Cruze with a diesel in the next few years, but more is needed. I can pray at least...

[quote fhp11]They are pumping out some good vehicles with good quality interiors, they suddenly decide that we can't have them when they were more than happy to let us have the not as good Mercedes generation cars. [/quote]
Don't get me started on the treatment Chrysler got under the Daimler. There was plenty of blame to go around but you can produce good cars when your R&D and engineering budgets get cut to the bone to fund projects at smart and Mercedes. Regardless, the folks in Auburn Hills are still looking for the billions in liquidity that they had stored away in their coffers before Bob Eaton jumped into bed with Jurgen Schrempp, who ferried them to Sttugart. And to think that Schrempp said in Der Spiegel that he played up the idea of "a merger of equals" to get the Americans to agree to combine companies....What a damn shame.

[quote fhp11]And has Dodge really been axed from the UK? The website is still up and running and our local dealer has a few 60 plate Journeys.[/quote]
Dodge will remain in Europe, but in limited form. The only vehicles you'll see in Europe with the Dodge badge moving forward are more bespoke products like the next generation Viper, Charger, Challenger, and the like. The rest of the models will be dropped or adopted by other brands in the Fiat-Chrysler Alliance.

[quote fhp11]Besides, the Journey will actually be coming to the UK, but just with a Fiat Badge as Fiat will be selling the Journey under their nameplate.[/quote]
Yup, that's exactly right. You can buy a Journey if you'd like, but it will likely be sold with a Fiat badge and revised front/rear styling. The interior, however, is supposed to remain identical, minus badges and some tweaking.

Greetings from New Jersey!

21 October 2010

They have cheap fuel, they get to have nice big engines that don't have to be so focussed on Economy. Its the same all over the world, China, the US, Australia . I can tell you that fuel is not cheap in Australia from what I seen the four weeks I was there and the 4 city,s I was in . It is around the same as prices in England around 1.35 Dollar a litre . They just need big cars there because the roads can go for ever and it can be very warm so they need powerfull reliable engines with good air con systems that they have on all day . In a small engined car you could not do that without losing engine power . There is pleanty off small cars there to mostly for city driving do . [quote fhp11]

But on the subject of the Journey, I'm liking the new interior. I really don't understand why now that They are pumping out some good vehicles with good quality interiors, they suddenly decide that we can't have them when they were more than happy to let us have the not as good Mercedes generation cars. And has Dodge really been axed from the UK? The website is still up and running and our local dealer has a few 60 plate Journeys. Besides, the Journey will actually be coming to the UK, but just with a Fiat Badge as Fiat will be selling the Journey under their nameplate.

[/quote] Me too it is a lot nicer than some more well regonised brands and looks High quility too . I always liked the Journey and this new interior really makes it better hopefully iff Dodge don,t sell it then Fiat will . Have not seen too many off these on the road do .

This Journey definately looks way better than say a VW Touran, Vauxhall Zafira or Toyota Verso....


I agree its much nicer than any off them and many more . awaould love too see it being succesfull .

21 October 2010

thats not a bad looker, & the interior looks like a good place to be! If this Dodge does make it to Europe under a Fiat badge then i think Fiat might have a good seller on its hands. Am i totally off the mark to suggest this then could become the new Multipla?

21 October 2010

I was going to ask "who cares?", but clearly some people do...

22 October 2010

[quote marktobin]Am i totally off the mark to suggest this then could become the new Multipla[/quote]

I think its definately going to replace the Multipla in the Lineup of vehicles, despite being slightly larger. Hopefully they wont call it multipla though because thats the gayest name in history.

To be honest, I hope Fiat dont change the styling of it if they do rebadge it, I really like the sort of Angry Muscular stance, I hate wishy washy euro design.

22 October 2010

[quote Autocar]Dodge has launched a facelifted Journey for 2011 – but the model won’t be coming to the UK after Dodge was axed from these shores by parent firm Fiat.[/quote] On my way home from a meal tonight I saw a Dodge dealership being dismantled! A victory for common sense. An ill informed move to sell "garbage" has resulted in failure. Good riddance, this is one journey I won't miss.

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • 2016 Audi A3 Sportback e-tron UK review
    First Drive
    29 September 2016
    First UK drive finds the facelifted A3 Sportback e-tron remains a first-rate plug-in hybrid that is packed with tech if a little short on driver appeal
  • Citroen C11.2 Puretech 82 Furio
    First Drive
    29 September 2016
    Citroën's city car gets a new sporty-looking trim level, adding visual adornments, but no premium for the 1.2-litre Puretech triple we're driving
  • Mercedes C350e Sport
    First Drive
    28 September 2016
    Petrol-electric C-Class is a surprisingly well-priced alternative to a diesel but not the greatest example of the new ‘PHEV’ breed
  • Car review
    23 September 2016
    Aston kicks off its ‘second century plan’ with an all-new turbo V12 grand tourer
  • Ford Ka+ 1.2 Ti-VCT 85
    First Drive
    22 September 2016
    A rounded, refined and well-sorted bargain supermini – once you’re used to the confusing role redefinition imposed on the once-cheeky Ka