Company bosses admit desire to return with car that can win outright

Porsche could return to Le Mans with a car capable of challenging for outright victory, according to company bosses.

Although he did not specify when a car would make its competitive debut, Porsche boss Michael Macht told Autosport the company had "big plans for the future" and promised an announcement "that will surprise you" in the spring.

He added: "Everyone in the Porsche family would be happy to go to Le Mans to challenge for victory again. When we do go we have to be prepared; we will only go if we have a chance to win."

Wolfgang Durheimer, Porsche board member in charge of motorsport, confirmed that there is no reason why Porsche and Audi couldn't race against each other at Le Mans, despite them both being part of the VW Group now.

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8

22 December 2009

not even a slightest chance against diesel power :)

22 December 2009

Blimey! It's taken you all this time to get to page 18?

22 December 2009

[quote orandzh]not even a slightest chance against diesel power :)[/quote]

You did know diesel makes less powerful engines than petrol?

Anyway diesel is banned now so it doesn't matter. (As it couldn't compete on fair terms)

22 December 2009

[quote beachland2]

You did know diesel makes less powerful engines than petrol?

Anyway diesel is banned now so it doesn't matter. (As it couldn't compete on fair terms)

[/quote] What do you mean by saying banned? As far as I know they just made fuel tanks smaller for diesel powered vehicles. And while petrol might produce more power than equivalently sized diesel don't forget about torque and frugality diesel engines boast of.

22 December 2009

Torque and economy even combined pluses come nowhere near being relevant enough to be useful in motor sport compared to power, for that reason that is why the diesel manufactures would only enter the sport with engines far bigger than the petrol engines or turbocharged when the petrols were normally aspirated.

22 December 2009

It seems like the backlash against the diesels has been watered down, a quick look at some regulations for 2011 says they are allowed incorporated into new engine regs for the classes (v10 and v12 are now banned):

I'm devastated to be honest it's outrageous.

How can it be fair to pitch a 2.0 single turbo petrol against a 3.7 twin turbo diesel?

And to make things even worse the weight advantage that a 2.0 petrol would have is even taken away, both cars are forced to have the same weight!

Alas, diesels probably will continue to dominate le mans...

23 December 2009

"Although he did not specify when a car would make its competitive debut, Porsche boss Michael Macht told Autosport the company had "big plans for the future" and promised an announcement "that will surprise you" in the spring."

The surprise is that it will be based on a Cayenne!!

Seriously though, hopefully it will be based on the Cayman rather than the 911.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

23 December 2009

The entry alone cant be a suprise so it must be something to do with the car, perhaps porsche will enter a hybrid.

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