Prime Minister David Cameron has drawn up plans to privatise roads, which will "reduce congestion"

Prime Minister David Cameron has drawn up plans to privatise roads, which he says will “reduce congestion.”

Under the new plans, investors would bid to own highways over a long lease period, which would then be privately maintained thanks to yearly government funding; this extra cash injection could come from inflated road tax costs.

On top of this, privately owned roads could also introduce toll charging, but only on extended stretches of existing highway.

One stretch of road, which has been flagged up for extension and toll charging is the A14 from Felixstowe in Suffolk to its junction with the M1 at Cathorpe. It is frequently used by freight lorries and suffers from heavy congestion.

Smaller roads are not included in government plans and would continue to be maintained by local authorities.

AA president Edmund King said: "Longer term plans, procurement and five-year funding agreements would help improve efficiency.

"However, there is a big leap between reform of the Highways Agency and new ownership and financing models.

"The Government has indicated that tolls would only apply on new capacity but many drivers would suspect new ownership is the thin end of the wedge leading to national road pricing."

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33

19 March 2012

[quote Autocar]Prime Minister David Cameron has drawn up plans to privatise roads, which he says will “reduce congestion.”

Under the new plans, investors would bid to own highways over a long lease period, which would then be privately maintained thanks to yearly government funding; this extra cash injection could come from inflated road tax costs.

On top of this, privately owned roads could also introduce toll charging, but only on extended stretches of existing highway.

One stretch of ... Read the full article[/quote] Here we go again!,more tax on drivers,your really gong to love that down South,it's bad enough that the cost of living has risen about 30%, but to add more tax to cars which are expensive as it is, isn't going to do wonders come election time,yes, the main M-ways will be quieter,less congested, but we, the drivers will do what we always do, use "A"&"B" roads, which will shift the congestion there,over to you Mr Cameron.

Peter Cavellini.

19 March 2012

Why are roads going to be privatised where there can be no competition; this will go the same way as the rail network - with ever increasing fares (tolls) that bear no relation to the very slow pace of infrastructure build.

It seems that this is just another big-Government wheeze for off loading liabilities onto the consumer/tax payer which keeps Minister's off the hook for the continued poor state of the road network. i.e. when was the last time a Minister (as opposed to Network Rail) was held to account over the cost of rail fares, parking charges, over-crowding & infrastructure.

19 March 2012

The only way you can ease congestion is through pricing people off the roads. So what this amonuts too is a way for the government to increase your taxes whilst at the same time reducing your access to the roads you you are already paying for! But you pay more for your car's than in most other Western countries so why not pay more for your road use?

19 March 2012

How many times do we all have to go through this farce of the Government off-loading it's basic responsibilities to the private sector who are then given subsidies to do what the Government should be doing in the first place and also charging us, the "client" or "stake-holder" (or whatever in modern speak), to use what we have already paid for in any case ? (Sounds like they are going to be doing the same with whatever the Royal Mail is calling itself this week.) This latest idea from "call me Dave" will simply lead to hugely higher motoring costs (road charging anyone?) and huge profits for whichever companies take up his subsidies whilst spending as little as they can get away with on improving the infrastructure.


Enjoying a Fabia VRs - affordable performance

19 March 2012

Blimey this is utter hogwash .

Dear Mr Camoron why not bin foreign aid and actually do somehting to support your own countrymen rather than taxing them to a standstill .

When at home I live near and regularly use the A14 and there is not much in the way of alternate routes to it . Its congested because it was made with 2 lanes rather than 3 and the really bad stretch from Huntingdon to Cambridge is only 2 lanes but is fed by 3 lanes from the A1 and 2 from the A14 .

I swear our politicians are getting dumber by the day.

Hit the poor motorist cos he cant avoid your dumb taxes .

Utter lunacy .

Are there any motoring freindly Politicains out there of any Party . Get this we need cars to get to work as public transport is an expensive joke .

I would actually like to return to the UK to live and work . The reasons for coming back seem to diminish by the day .

289

19 March 2012

I would have thought after the privatisation of the Rail network and the fallout from that, the government would know better.

This will only end badly!

19 March 2012

Amount raised by VED: c.£7BN

Amount raised by fuel duties: >£30BN

Amount spend maintaining UK roads: c.£4BN

As per all the above excellent comments, this is all about the Government - our democratically elected Government - trying to get themselves out of the economic clag whilst avoiding taxing their wealthy friends.

Given that they've been doing this since year dot it should not come as any surprise. What is surprising is that as always they will get away with it due to our collective apathy. We talk alot but we do nothing folks.

19 March 2012

Fellow readers ignore this story, executive chairman of Haymarket publishing is Rupert Heseltine, his father Michael Heseltine was a conservative minister under M Thatcher.

Is the story a smoke screen to take the heat off Andrew Lansley?

Autocar you should keep out of politics.

19 March 2012

[quote Sandy T]

Amount raised by VED: c.£7BN

Amount raised by fuel duties: >£30BN

Amount spend maintaining UK roads: c.£4BN

As per all the above excellent comments, this is all about the Government - our democratically elected Government - trying to get themselves out of the economic clag whilst avoiding taxing their wealthy friends.

Given that they've been doing this since year dot it should not come as any surprise. What is surprising is that as always they will get away with it due to our collective apathy. We talk alot but we do nothing folks.

[/quote]

+1

lrh

19 March 2012

Because privatising the utilities and railways worked so well... Highest prices ever, worst service ever. How about spending more of the money already collected in road/fuel tax on the roads instead of diverting elsewhere?

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