More low emissions zones to save lives, says report

Satellite low emission zones are needed in London to reduce an estimated 3000 pollution-related deaths in the capital each year, a London Assembly report has warned.

The study has called for a number of urgent measures to improve air quality and says emissions - “mainly from diesel engines” - are contributing to a wide range of health problems.

Government figures estimate pollution-related health costs for the UK have reached £20 billion a year.

The Assembly Environment Committee now wants London mayor Boris Johnson to look into using biofuel for all public transport and reduce bus emissions by 90 per cent.

It also wants targeted low emission zones and electronic information panels in public areas that will relay real time pollution levels.

The report also said the mayor should also look at more ways to get people out of their cars and onto bicycles in and around the capital.

Darren Johnson, Chair of the Environment Committee said: “London’s air pollution is a serious problem now and for future generations. Reducing air pollution is not just about improving the environment in some abstract way. Our report shows that it’s about saving lives.”

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Car review
    29 July 2015
    Smaller, less pricey follow-up to the SLS reveals its true capabilities
  • First Drive
    29 July 2015
    It's nearly the end of the line for the perennial Land Rover Defender. This Heritage limited edition harks back to the early days
  • First Drive
    28 July 2015
    Seat enhances its three-door Leon Cupra 280 with Nürburgring-inspired add-ons, but the effect is mostly limited to visuals
  • First Drive
    28 July 2015
    Honda's new small SUV needs to excel in an extremely competitive class. We drive the diesel in the UK to see if it's up to the task
  • Car review
    23 July 2015
    Mazda goes Juke hunting, with its Skyactiv-generation baby SUV