Firm commits to carbonfibre tech to reduce weight; second image of new Paris concept released

Lamborghini plans to make extensive use of carbonfibre to reduce the weight of all its future models as part of its shift away from making cars with ever-increasing top speeds.

Lamborghini president and CEO Stephan Winkelmann believes a reduction in weight of its models will allow the firm to further improve handling and acceleration, as well as increasing power-to-weight ratios.

See the teaser pics of the new Lamborghini concept - plus spy pics of the new Murciélago

His comments were made in an official statement – titled Lamborghini’s manifesto for future super sports cars – released alongside the second teaser image of its new Paris concept car, which Autocar understands will preview the all-new Murciélago.

The concept car will make extensive use of carbonfibre, something Winkelmann said every new Lamborghini would feature. This material is shown prominently in both of the teaser pics released so far ahead of the concept’s debut at Paris on 30 September.

Read more on Lamborghini's Paris show concept

Winkelmann said that since the mid-1980s, the average Lamborghini’s weight had increased by around 500kg due to “active and passive safety, comfort and emissions reduction issues”.

“This is something we have to change,” he said. “Since we cannot reduce safety or comfort, we have to reduce the weight by using new materials.

“Speed is not as important anymore, because all super sports cars are exceeding 300km/h (186mph) and this is a speed you cannot reach even on a racetrack, let alone normal roads.

“We think it is time to make a shift and talk more about handling and acceleration.”

Read more on the new Lamborghini Murciélago

See all the latest Lamborghini Murciélago reviews, news and video

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Comments
6

14 September 2010

Common sense talk from a CEO? has the world gone mad??

Surely he knows he will be slated when Lambo produce a car that cannot "in theory" pass a Ferrari - whereas most drivers will be excited by improved handling I am sure.


Just would love to have the opportunity to try a current Lambo and then again in ten years time and report back on whether the prediction has come true!

To live is to drive

14 September 2010

Since its handling the direction for Lambo's future they have offer to rwd versions. Skids are always welcome and you can do them even at 40mph. As for ultimate grip and pace rwd cars tend to lap the ring faster than awd.

Top speed is pointless but I can't imagine lambo doing a car slower than its current range.

14 September 2010

Using modern lightweight materials should be a given for a company like Lamborghini. However, a much cheaper solution would be to reduce the width of the car. This would not only reduce the weight with all the associated benefits but make the car much more useable on a typical british road.

15 September 2010

[quote Pepsi Max]a much cheaper solution would be to reduce the width of the car[/quote] This is probably the most sensible and simple solution I've heard in a long time. All cars are getting bigger and heavier, most of which I suspect is down to having to comply with more and more stringent so-called "safety" regulations that add more and more weight and complication in the race by legislators to achieve an unrealistically low casualty and fatality rate. Until politicians realise that these figures can't go lower and lower each and every year, cars will continue to get bigger and heavier for no sustainable reason.


Enjoying a Fabia VRs - affordable performance

18 September 2010

Weight reduction is always wellcome. It can increase perfomances and fuel economy but today it's the most expensive way to acheive it in automotive industry. Think about the 458 Italia, the first rumors were talking about a car 100 kg lighter than the Scuderia, in fact the 458 is over 100 kg heavier...a more real statement would be like this: we will try keep same weight adding power, new electronic system, double cluth boxes, etc.

18 September 2010

[quote matsoc]Weight reduction is always wellcome. It can increase perfomances and fuel economy but today it's the most expensive way to acheive it in automotive industry. Think about the 458 Italia, the first rumors were talking about a car 100 kg lighter than the Scuderia, in fact the 458 is over 100 kg heavier...a more real statement would be like this: we will try keep same weight adding power, new electronic system, double cluth boxes, etc.[/quote]

Thing is, Winkelmann's actually telling us how they're planning on implementing weight loss: carbon fibre. The existing cars use aluminium and steel construction - the Murcielago only uses CF in the bodyshell (which is offset by the archaic steel chassis), and the Gallardo uses none at all (other than optional interior trim). So they're likely to shed quite a bit with composite construction.

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