Blue-e-motion tech won't appear until seventh incarnation of VW's hatch

Volkswagen’s battery-powered Blue-e-motion Golf will not go on sale until late until late 2013 at the earliest, according to the company - and that's late enough to push it into the next generation of the iconic hatch.

VW has been wheeling out the Blue-e-motion for a series of drives this year - including an appearance at the recent Brighton to London Future Cars run. But engineers have admitted to Autocar that the EV family car is now sufficiently far off to make it likely that it will appear in the Mk7 Golf instead of the current Mk6.

It’s thought that an imminent platform switch is one of the reasons why the Nissan Leaf rival is so late to the market.

The current Mk6-based prototype Golf uses a 26.5kWh battery pack, marginally larger than that employed by the Leaf.

By using a three-stage (85kW, 65kW and 50kW) power output from the drive motor, VW says this prototype Golf can be coaxed into offering a range of as much as 90 miles. The driver can also select the amount of engine braking via paddle shifters.

Hilton Holloway

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Seventh generation Volkswagen Golf
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12 November 2010

EV will never catch on, ask the national grid on powering electric vehicle's, its bad enough they struggle to supply power to homes during half time of a world cup game when everyone puts the kettle on but to power vehicle's as well? not to mention to power them up as the same time as as filling up? and where are we going to source the energy to power everything? synthetic methanol is the way forward, petrol infrastructure is already set and as you know methanol burns completely leaving far less behind and can be made carbon neutral (not to mention more power from vehicles). Companies wasting money on this and London having charging points, in the end, we're the ones who have to pay for it all when it all goes wrong.

12 November 2010

[quote Rayman89] synthetic methanol is the way forward,[/quote]

...or even better, hydrogen fuel cell, only true clean energy so far.

12 November 2010

It will be interesting to see if the current breed of electric cars suffer the same fate as the GM EV1 where, I believe, most of the cars went straight from production to recycling without troubling the customer.

Maybe VW isn't so daft in delaying things a bit.

12 November 2010

[quote RadeB]

[quote Rayman89] synthetic methanol is the way forward,[/quote]

...or even better, hydrogen fuel cell, only true clean energy so far.

[/quote] The problem with all Eco friendly power sources in motor vehicles be they electric. alcohol based or hydrogen either burnt in a ic engine or used in a fuel cell is that they do not occur naturally and have to be made from another fuel source, usually a fossil fuel. As I understand it the Prius plug in version will not go on sale for at least another two years in the UK, there are a few being trialled in the UK on lease only. So the Golf will probably arrive about the same time as the Toyota plug in car.

12 November 2010

[quote RadeB]

[quote Rayman89] synthetic methanol is the way forward,[/quote]

...or even better, hydrogen fuel cell, only true clean energy so far.

[/quote] Clean in what sense? Hydrogen and methanol as fuel sources both have the same issue as electricity: where does the hydrogen or methanol come from? You have to make it, which is currently very inefficient. Hydrogen fuel cells also have the problem that currently, cars such as the Honda Clarity reportedly convert hydrogen into movement as inefficiently as a conventional car - vastly less efficient than an EV car whilst also being vastly more costly to produce than an EV car.

12 November 2010

[quote MrTrilby]Clean in what sense? Hydrogen and methanol as fuel sources both have the same issue as electricity: where does the hydrogen or methanol come from? You have to make it, which is currently very inefficient. [/quote]

The power for H2O hydrolysis is gained from solar panel energy,the hydrogen is then used in fuel cells.The technology exists for many years,NASA used it from the beginning of the Apollo program. Yes, it is expensive and inefficient for mass production,but if the development and resources were put in that way,surely they could be much cheaper and available. The system is working,with hydrogen fuel stations in Norway, from Oslo to Stavanger.

I just don't get EV,the end pollution will not decrease on global level,and the need for electric energy,hence the prices, will rise enormously.

I will just bring over one opinion from Richard Pike,CEO of the Royal Society of Chemistry,that if the whole fleet of vehicles in UK was replaced with EV the cost would be 150 billions pounds, and the emission of CO2 will decrease only 2% !

As I"m getting older, I believe in conspiracy theories more andmore, and I think something fishy is going on!

12 November 2010

[quote RadeB]The power for H2O hydrolysis is gained from solar panel energy,the hydrogen is then used in fuel cells.The technology exists for many years,NASA used it from the beginning of the Apollo program. Yes, it is expensive and inefficient for mass production,but if the development and resources were put in that way,surely they could be much cheaper and available. The system is working,with hydrogen fuel stations in Norway, from Oslo to Stavanger.[/quote]

If you're generating electricity from solar panels, isn't it far more sensible to put that energy directly into the batteries of EVs? It's a vastly more efficient process.

Are Norway really using solar power to produce hydrogen? They're even further north than we are, so solar is even more marginal. I'd think it would be far more likely they are producing it from natural gas, of which they have plenty. Still a very inefficient process though - much more efficient to burn the gas in a turbine and generate electricity to charge a battery.

12 November 2010

[quote MrTrilby]If you're generating electricity from solar panels, isn't it far more sensible to put that energy directly into the batteries of EVs? It's a vastly more efficient process.[/quote] Why batteries for EV,s at all!?

Fuel Cell Vehicles( FCV's) are entirely different concept from EV.They consists generally speaking of: Hydrogen Storage Tank,High Output Battery which stores energy generated from regenerative braking and provides supplemental power to the electric motor, Fuel Cell Stack, Power Control Unit and Electric Motor. No large battery packs which are expensive and may need to be replaced one or more times.Even the disposal of the batteries for cell phones presents problem.

So far the hydrogen storage tank is still too large, heavy, and expensive.In the field of the other problem,hydrogen station refilling grid and systems,there are big improvements.

The previous solar hydrogen station system required both an electrolyzer and a separate compressor unit to create high pressure hydrogen. The compressor was the largest and most expensive component and reduced system efficiency. By creating a new high differential pressure electrolyzer, Honda engineers were able to eliminate the compressor entirely - a world's first for a home use system.
Designed to support the needs of the future owners of fuel cell electric vehicles, the Honda Solar Hydrogen Station was also designed to complement a public network of fast fill hydrogen stations. The Honda FCX Clarity electric vehicle is fast fill capable and offers an EPA-estimated driving range of 240 miles. With fast fill public stations providing 5-minute fueling time for longer trips, and the opportunity of convenient nighttime slow filling at home using a solar station with a Smart Grid connection, the Honda FCX Clarity can cover a wide range of driving demands from the daily commute to weekend trips.These new solar station systems are highly efficient,even in northern countries.

A key strategy in creating a solar hydrogen station for home-use was to create a new lifestyle with convenient, clean, energy-efficient and sustainable home refueling, by addressing the need for refueling infrastructure that can advance the wider use of fuel cell electric vehicles by consumers.

12 November 2010

[quote RadeB]No large battery packs which are expensive and may need to be replaced one or more times.Even the disposal of the batteries for cell phones presents problem.
[/quote]

Early days; the impatient want to jump on every possible problem, throw their hands up and surrender before the war starts. It’s good for competition and choice that different manufacturers are trying different things, whether government should be involved is another matter. I read this the other day and found it interesting, if it works it means you could take your car in and have the battery system refurbished while you wait…

GM Applies for Patent for Lithium-ion Battery Cell Refurbishing System

You don’t need a weatherman
To know which way the wind blows
—Robert Allen Zimmerman

12 November 2010

[quote jackjflash]Early days; the impatient want to jump on every possible problem, throw their hands up and surrender before the war starts.[/quote]

My problem with this topic is that I have never read face to face comparison for cost-benefit of these technologies,from any relevant study. From what I've read, plug- in EV could prove wrong in long terms.Can you estimate how much it will cost you,monthly or annually with this electricity prices. You can be sure that shortly after EV are sold in big numbers,the governments will sense blood and the price will go up, it happened with diesel and LPG,at least in my country it did.

The information from the link you provide is very good and promising, but allow me to think that the combination of solar/wind source of hydrogen and fuel cell cars could be much better solution with solving the present shortcomings.

http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/fcv_benefits.shtml

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