British motorists are becoming more inward looking, according to the RAC Report on Motoring 2010

British motorists are becoming more inward looking, according to the RAC Report on Motoring 2010.

The annual report found that the sample of 1150 British motorists care more about other road users' behaviour and the state of their local roads, rather than more general global issues.

Of those surveyed, 96 per cent of motorists are concerned by mobile phone usage when driving, 97 per cent are concerned about drunk or drugged drivers, and 88 per cent think the state of their local roads is becoming worse.

The report also suggests that the impact of the recession has seen a growing interest in more economical vehicles, with Brits buying fewer luxury and 4x4 cars.

However, it also suggests that the environment is not a priority of motorists as 35 per cent of those polled believe nothing they will do will make a difference.

Despite this, 74 per cent said they would buy a more environmentally-friendly new car if tax incentives for doing so were better.

Two out of three motorists said they would use their car less if public transport was improved and two in five had changed their driving style to conserve fuel.

There has been an increase in the amount of drivers breaking the law with 28 per cent admitting to using their mobile while driving and 12 per cent knowingly driving when over the alcohol limit.

The case for over 70s to take refresher tests is increasing with 69 per cent of motorists agreeing with the idea. somehthing 80-year-old Sir Stirling Moss also backs.

The report concludes by calling on the new coalition government to do more to create joined up transport initiatives – both private and public – and better use of existing resources.

Andrew Papworth

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31

12 July 2010

Hmm an interesting survey . I notice they didnt ask how many motorists think man made climate change is a myth to screw more taxes out of us that do not pay for road improvements .

Oh and most of us plebs have to have smaller and smaller cars as we cant afford large ones any more .

Rant over .

12 July 2010

[quote Autocar]35 per cent of those polled believe nothing they will do will make a difference. Despite this, 74 per cent said they would buy a more environmentally-friendly new car if tax incentives for doing so were better.

[/quote]

The other 65 per cent are mad. We need to stop all tax incentives towards buying little ecoboxes - the whole carbon thing is a myth being peddled to tax us even more, and, as anyone knows, it's more environmentally-friendly to keep your old gas-guzzler going than to buy a new little hatchback. Also, have those trying to force us into smaller cars thought that, perhaps, some people (families, people who need to tow heavy trailers/horseboxes) actually NEED big cars?

12 July 2010

"Of those surveyed, 96 per cent of motorists are concerned by mobile phone usage when driving ....There has been an increase in the amount of drivers breaking the law with 28 per cent admitting to using their mobile while driving..."

Well I guess understanding you have a problem is the first stage in dealing with it...

12 July 2010

[quote Straight Six Man] as anyone knows, it's more environmentally-friendly to keep your old gas-guzzler going than to buy a new little hatchback.[/quote] I don't suppose you actually have any evidence to justify your belief in that myth? [quote Straight Six Man]some people (families, people who need to tow heavy trailers/horseboxes) actually NEED big cars[/quote] Few people need to tow horse boxes or heavy trailers. Plenty of people choose to. Including me.

12 July 2010

[quote Straight Six Man]It's more environmentally-friendly to keep your old gas-guzzler going than to buy a new little hatchback[/quote]

Absolutely. The longer you can keep an older car running, the 'greener' you are being, in my opinion.

And you're helping to keep small, independent garages and parts suppliers (many of which have seen a drop-off in trade thanks to scrappage, for instance) in business that bit longer.

12 July 2010

Yep. Supporting local, labour-intensive aftersales businesses to re-use what you have rather than capital-intensive and resource-eating industries on the other side of the globe to 'recycle' old cars into brand spanking new ones on the whole sounds like a far more sustainable strategy to me.

In my estimation when regarded like-for-like, about 80% of CO2 reductions afforded by new cars versus those of say, 10-15 years ago, merely exist on paper anyway as cars become ever more 'optimised' towards the rather unrealistic EU 'driving cycle'...

12 July 2010

of course the longer a car lasts the better it is for the environment, this is one of the flaws with the Prius, the carbon footprint for producing one is ridiculously high. With a car already on the road the its only the pollution and the end of life disposal of the car thats an issue, with a new car there is the mining for the raw materials, production and distribution as well.

With some of the more allegedly eco friendly cars these include battery elements only found in China and huge logistical operations, the ships that transport the Prius are hardly likey to be hybrid.

It would be interesting to see which has the lower environmental impact, a new hybrid over the ten year battery duration or a Countach over its life.

waste is bad for the environment, getting rid of cars before neccesary is waste

12 July 2010

[quote feckin maso]Waste is bad for the environment, getting rid of cars before neccesary is waste[/quote]

A short, sharp sentence that sums up perfectly the environmental advantage of running a well maintained old car. Thank you

12 July 2010

[quote feckin maso]of course the longer a car lasts the better it is for the environment, this is one of the flaws with the Prius, the carbon footprint for producing one is ridiculously high.[/quote]

Complete nonsense. There are a number of estimates kicking around for how much CO2 is produced during the manufacture of a typical car, ranging from .5 tonnes through to 2 tonnes. The .5 tonne estimates are manufacturers being cute, by quoting only what they produce and not including figures from their suppliers. 2 tonnes seems a realistic estimate.

A 1.6 diesel Ford Focus - a pretty efficient family car - emits 1.8 tonnes of CO2 every 10k miles. Over a life of 150k miles, it outputs more than 27 tonnes of CO2. Way more than it took to manufacture it.

As far as keeping old cars going by manufacturing and fitting replacement components, how many trips back to a garage do you think you need to make before the environmental impact adds up of making those spare parts, keeping a logistics chain running to supply them to a garage, keeping the garage running, the emissions of the people employed by the garage... ...compared to the 2 tonnes to produce a new more efficient and cleaner one?

And that's ignoring the benefit of removing older dirtier cars from the road and replacing them with cleaner emissions - particulate and NOx emissions from a car that meets modern emission standards is vastly improved over even relatively recent cars. And that has a direct measurable benefit to the health of all of us, irrespective of what you think of CO2 or climate change.

12 July 2010

Sorry, but anyone who thinks emissions of harmful gases of post- '93 lambda-controlled, three-way catalysed petrol-fuelled cars pose a threat to the environment needs to get a perspective. In the most polluted areas of Western Europe, chances are the air comes out of them cleaner than it went in.

That, and those '2 tonnes of CO2' for producing a new car don't even scratch the surface of the energy balance when looking at the [i]whole[/i] chain - for starters, all those Hyundai i10s bought on scrappage needed to get to the UK from the other end of the world and replaced older cars that on average did 3-4,000 miles a year. I'd wager to guess their owners drive a lot more now they have a brand spanking new, warrantied car...

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