Sporty new mid-size 4x4 set to take on BMW X3 and Range Rover Evoque from next April; three turbo V6 models at launch, priced from £43,300
18 November 2013

Porsche is aiming to attract a new customer base with the launch of the Macan, the German manufacturer’s fifth model line, at the Los Angeles motor show.

It has been conceived to appeal to both dyed-in-the-wool enthusiasts and family car buyers and will be a key part of Porsche’s plans to pass 200,000 annual sales.

The initial line-up, due to arrive in the UK next April, consists of the trio of highly specified six-cylinder models. The £59,300 Macan Turbo, £43,300 Macan S and £43,300 Macan Diesel S all feature a seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox and permanent four-wheel drive as standard.

In a move crucial to its existence, the Macan is based around the same platform as the Audi Q5. The two share a similar high-strength steel floorpan, bulkheads and body structure, together with various driveline, chassis and electrical components. However, the Macan will be built in Porsche’s Leipzig factory, separately from the Q5. 

Read Autocar's first ride in the new Porsche Macan 4x4

Drawing inspiration from the second-generation Cayenne, the Macan has an aggressive appearance fully reflecting its positioning as a sporting rival for the Audi Q5, BMW X3 and Range Rover Evoque. The design and detailing brings a family look to Porsche’s SUV line-up — something Porsche says was driven by feedback gained in early styling clinics for the new model.

At 4699mm in length, 1923mm in width and 1624mm in height, the Macan is 146mm shorter, 16mm narrower and 82mm lower than the second-generation Cayenne, itself due to receive a mid-life facelift next year. Compared with the Q5, the Macan is 70mm longer, 24mm wider and 30mm lower.

Double wishbone front and multi-link rear suspension feature with variable damping control and an electro-mechanical steering system. Air suspension is optional.

The original Audi set-up has been optimised with tracks that are up by 35mm in width at the front and 36mm at the rear, along with unique suspension components and revised geometry and software to provide the Macan with what Porsche describes as “the most agile handling in its class”.

A kerb weight of 1865kg for the Macan S makes it 200kg lighter than the Cayenne S, while the Macan Turbo tips the scales at 245kg less than the Cayenne Turbo, at 1925kg.

The Macan, whose name is derived from the Indonesian word for tiger, will be launched in the UK with the choice of three V6 engines: two in-house direct-injection petrol units and a single Audi-sourced turbodiesel. Porsche has fitted the petrol units with an exhaust flap that is claimed to provide them with what it describes as “robust acoustic qualities”.

The most powerful engine is the newly developed twin-turbo 3.6-litre V6 in the Macan Turbo. It develops 394bhp at 6000rpm and 405lb ft at 1350-4500rpm to give the initial range-topper a 0-62mph time of 4.8sec (or 4.6sec with an optional Sport Chrono pack) and a 165mph top speed.

Below it is the mid-range Macan S. It runs a twin-turbo 3.0-litre V6 with 335bhp at 6500rpm and 339lb ft at 1450-5000rpm. Porsche claims 0-62mph in 5.4sec (or 5.2sec with the Sport Chrono pack) and a 158mph top speed.

Also available from launch is a 3.0-litre V6 turbodiesel in the Macan Diesel S. It produces 254bhp at 4250rpm and 427lb ft from 1750-2500rpm. This is sufficient for 0-62mph in 6.3sec (6.1sec with the Sport Chrono pack) and a 143mph top speed, along with a claimed 46.3mpg combined and 159g/km of CO2 emissions.     

Further engines are planned in 2015, including a turbocharged 2.0-litre, four-cylinder petrol unit with 280bhp in the future base Macan. Also set for introduction is a 2.0-litre, four-cylinder turbodiesel in a price-leading Macan Diesel. These will be the first four-cylinder Porsches since the 968 of 1995.

In a weight-saving move, the Macan eschews the mechanical Torsen torque-sensing four-wheel drive system used by the Q5 in favour of an electronically controlled multi-plate clutch arrangement engineered by Porsche for a rear-biased drive, although up to 100 per cent of drive can go to the front wheels if conditions demand it. An off-road mode also features.

Nothing is official yet, but in tests the Macan Turbo is said to have lapped the Nürburgring in the low eight-minute bracket, placing it on a par with performance cars such as the outgoing BMW M3.

Read more 2013 LA motor show news.

Our Verdict

Porsche Macan
The new Porsche Macan is offered with a choice of three engines, including a 3.0-litre turbodiesel

New 'junior Cayenne' promises to be the most sporting SUV yet

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Comments
16

20 November 2013
.. or did someone take a picture off a Cayanne and just hit the reduce size botton on a photocopier...tell me if I am worng but looking at the side profile it doe slook like they used the main body sheell of the Q5 and just grafted on a new nose section and changed the rear lights... Apart from the rear 3/4 to me this is even uglier than the Cayenne..

20 November 2013
... but why the hell is it so damn heavy?

 

Please insert paragraps where needed.

20 November 2013
[quote=tuga]... but why the hell is it so damn heavy?[/quote] [quote=tuga]... but why the hell is it so damn heavy?[/quote] Indeed. German engineering is not so great and as advanced as some of the propaganda makes them out to be. So many German cars are simply overweight, despite their claims of using lightweight materials here and there. Jaguar and Land Rover are the companies leading the way in engineering prowess. Look at a Range Rover Sport, it's from the class above the Macan and sports a proper 4x4 drivetrain, yet it's only less than 200kg more than the Macan. Porsche? More like Porker.

20 November 2013
[quote=Roadster][quote=tuga]... but why the hell is it so damn heavy?[/quote] [quote=tuga]... but why the hell is it so damn heavy?[/quote] Indeed. German engineering is not so great and as advanced as some of the propaganda makes them out to be. So many German cars are simply overweight, despite their claims of using lightweight materials here and there. Jaguar and Land Rover are the companies leading the way in engineering prowess. Look at a Range Rover Sport, it's from the class above the Macan and sports a proper 4x4 drivetrain, yet it's only less than 200kg more than the Macan. Porsche? More like Porker.[/quote] Ok lets squash this one...Agreed that jag/LR are doing some good things with weight but the so called claimed weight figures that Range Rover and there so called weight saving that they keep putting out have been proven to be a liitle bit exagerated.. i think one of the other car mags did some analysis when RR said they had saved like 350 to 400 KG new to old.. when they took the new range rover actual weight figures, added the so called weight savings, then weighed the old equivalent model ..the figures didint stack up at all.. It meant the old car was nearly 200KG+ heavier on paper than its actual weight. And the old one was a porker anyway! So please to say german cars are over weight compared to jag and RR is a bit misleading.. to be honest I am always surprised at the weight of the Jag and RR given that they are now using so much aluminium and other tech to reduce the overall weight.. example the JG XJ 3.0 D weighs in at 1900 kg and the Equivalent S-class the 350 CDI weighs in at 2100 KG, so given that the S has so much more on board tech, is dimensionally a little bigger in every way and uses much less aluminum than the jag.. I really thought there would be more than just 200KG difference..

20 November 2013
[quote=tuga] ... but why the hell is it so damn heavy? [/quote] Wondering the same thing...! The petrol turbo manages to be heavier than the diesel SQ5 which shares the underpinnings, how does that work? For the extra weight you do get a smaller boot, though....


20 November 2013
I like the rear end, it's nice to finally see an actual photo of it rather than the never ending procession of photo-shopped examples we've seen up till now. And you have to laugh at the way these cars are introduced to the world, because there always seems to be an impossibly short time between the appearance of pictures of new cars like this being supposedly 'caught testing', to when a fully signed off production example appears glinting in the bright lights of the next motor show. The same time frame happened with the 991. Mysterious camo shots taken at the ring portraying a lashed together with duck tape workshop project. A few weeks later at the Frankfurt Motorshow - TADAAAA..! The only conclusion you can come to is that all the genuine design, testing and interior/exterior brochure shots have been completed a long long time ago, well away from the prying eyes of the motoring press, and the so called 'test mules' are sent out a pre-determined time before the official unveiling to generate a bit of pre-show hype. Call me a cynic but I'm sure that when Autocar were invited all the way over to California for a first ride in the Macan a few weeks ago, it wasn't a Porsche test team that were the tour guides - more a very well prepared marketing team designed to start the publicity ball rolling.

20 November 2013
Well, after all the spy shots and leaked photos, I have to say the Macan barely looks any better. Porsche really cannot design a truly great looking car. Land Rover and Jaguar have nothing to worry about here, and that's just in the looks department.

23 November 2013
[quote=Roadster]Well, after all the spy shots and leaked photos, I have to say the Macan barely looks any better. Porsche really cannot design a truly great looking car. Land Rover and Jaguar have nothing to worry about here, and that's just in the looks department.[/quote] Outside of the UK, Land Rover has plenty to worry about, not just from the Macan, but from nearly any competitor in it's class. While capable and attractive Land Rovers/Range Rovers suffer from mind-boggling depreciation, which is hardly surprising given their rankings in reliability studies. Being recognized as the least reliable vehicle available is hardly confidence inspiring. Is it any wonder most of them are leased?

20 November 2013
but as it is a car a lot of us would consider as a work-horse why not tell us if there is any room in it? Can I get four golf bags/my ski gear for a two week holiday/ my sailing gear/my racing kit/my dogs in the back? I accept we are all obsessed about performance that we rarely ever use - what the hell it matters how fast an SUV can get around a track in the middle of Germany is beyond me - but if this thing is going to conquer sales of estate cars and other more obvious rivals it needs to work for a living surely?

20 November 2013
[quote=johnfaganwilliams] but as it is a car a lot of us would consider as a work-horse why not tell us if there is any room in it? Can I get four golf bags/my ski gear for a two week holiday/ my sailing gear/my racing kit/my dogs in the back? [/quote] The boot is quoted as 500l, same as a Mazda CX-5. Somehow Porsche managed to lose 40l vs the Audi Q5...


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