Honda's new SUV has been revealed to the American market, where it will soon go on sale; it won’t head to Europe until late 2017 or 2018, though
16 November 2016

The 2017 Honda CR-V has been revealed at the LA motor show shortly ahead of it going on sale in the US. However, it won't reach the UK until late 2017 at the earliest.

Visual highlights on the new car include LED lights front and rear, a longer bonnet and narrowed A-pillars for improved visibility. The car rides on 18 or 19in alloy wheels and sits higher than the current model.

The fifth-generation mid-sized SUV has an all-new platform and features turbocharged powertrain options for the first time. Wider, and with a longer wheelbase, it has more sculpted styling than the current CR-V, and reflects Honda’s desire to make the car a more premium product than its predecessor.

A Honda UK spokesman previously suggested to Autocar that the new CR-V represents a bid to rival more premium products such as the Land Rover Discovery Sport and Volvo XC60.

“The CR-V is a massive pillar for us,” he said. “I’m not sure that HR-V in the UK will ever become a four-wheel-drive car; most people in this segment will vote with their feet and buy two-wheel drive. So if we can assume that HR-V will only ever be two-wheel drive, then you’ve got to come up with a different proposition [with the CR-V].

“Can we compete with Land Rover as a brand? That’s less about CR-V and more about Honda as a brand." 

Inside the new CR-V, Honda promises class-leading space and rear leg room, with better-quality materials and “more intricately stitched seats”. Rear passengers get a volume control for the sound system, while up front there’s the option of a 7.0in screen running an Android operating system with sat-nav, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. Other features include a hands-free tailgate, operated by a wave of a foot under the rear bumper, while a myriad of safety features have helped the car towards achieving a five-star rating in US crash tests.

Only the CR-V’s petrol engine options have so far been announced, which in the US will include a 190bhp turbocharged 1.5-litre four-cylinder unit and a 2.4-litre direct-injection iVTEC with 184bhp. Both will be mated to a continuously variable transmission (CVT). The 1.5-litre turbo engine is expected to make its way to the UK and is likely to be joined by the 1.6-litre iDTEC diesel unit used in the Civic, with a manual gearbox option being added to the line-up too.

Both front and four-wheel-drive versions will be available, with revised suspension for improved handling. The CR-V's suspension features MacPherson front struts and a multi-link rear, with tubular anti-roll bars at the front and solid ones at the back.

The 2017 CR-V will be built at three plants in North America: East Liberty, Ohio, and Greensburg, Indiana, in the US and Alliston, Ontario, in Canada.

Phill Tromans

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Comments
21

7 July 2015
For goodness sake, the CR-V needs something more than 150 PS from it's diesel to compete now as the competition has had 180-200 PS for years - going bigger with the next model will just make that even more imperative.

7 July 2015
Ruperts Trooper wrote:

For goodness sake, the CR-V needs something more than 150 PS from it's diesel to compete now as the competition has had 180-200 PS for years - going bigger with the next model will just make that even more imperative.

Its a 160ps 1.6 these days and CRV never felt desperately short of pace compared to others due to conservative power ratings and keeping an eye on the weight. But yes it should have more as even the new Hyundai will be available with a 182ps.

See plenty of new X-Trails around, its huge, 7 seat, 4WD yet has to make do with only 128 bhp!

And don't forget that not getting carried away with the power keeps the CO2 down even with 4wd and keeps the car from sliding off company car lists.

7 July 2015
Why on earth, when the CR-V is likely to grow, would you put a 1.5 non-turbo petrol in there?? Its distinct lack of torque is noted even in the HR-V, this cannot be accurate.


A34

7 July 2015
bomb wrote:

Why on earth, when the CR-V is likely to grow, would you put a 1.5 non-turbo petrol in there?? Its distinct lack of torque is noted even in the HR-V, this cannot be accurate.

Either that or Honda hasn't realised that Premium = Power (and Size!)...

7 July 2015
I have a CR-V, it is absolutely fine at what it does and what I expect from it, I certainly do not need 7 seats, nor for the next one to be any bigger or have any more poke or be any more expensive... but i would appreciate trim colour choice outside of the funeral black... and maybe more than just blue red grey and black hues of paint... learn something from BMW, Mercedes and Lexus here...

If I wanted something more I might have bought a Merc or LR or BMW, but I didn't... Honda is in danger of driving itself so far up market it will lose the client base it has gathered over 20 years altogether, see Land Rover, (now a complete muddle of expensive overpriced cars that have left many of us behind) and also where the volume and profitability sits seems to be in politically volatile China, Russia and other emerging nations. I am waiting for the bubble to burst, it has started withthe fall of the Chinese stock market some 30% in the last month or so... LR beware!

Honda please have a rethink, the CR-V is fine as it is now you have the small Deisel and 9 speed auto box... if you must go bigger make a new model extended wheel base model... but leave the current CR-V to go on succeeding where it is...

8 July 2015
the instigator wrote:

leave the current CR-V to go on succeeding where it is...

Why don't Honda just stick to what they are good at. My Dad loves his CR-V, he had a mk1 and now drives a mk2, no doubt he will trade it in for a mk3 next time... it is the perfect size for him, with room for occasional family trips plus luggage but still able to fit into supermarket parking spaces. He likes a petrol automatic and his CR-V is not too big so it still has acceptable running costs. He would not enjoy driving a small diesel engine and thinks they are a false economy as there is more to go wrong on them than with a standard petrol engine. (I happen to agree with him).

If Honda want to sell a bigger 7 seat 4x4 then fine, and if they want to push the HR-V then fine, but it won't appeal to my Dad. He just wants a medium sized petrol auto 4x4 that gives around 30mpg, he doesn't want a cramped 2wd crossover and he doesn't want something massive with a stupid little diesel engine. I suspect there are a lot of satisfied CR-V drivers that would say the same.

currently a happy owner of a Mitsubishi Shogun Pinin :)

8 July 2015
Will need more power!

8 July 2015
The 1.5 struggles in the HR-V god knows how bad it would be in the bigger car. Does this mean the current 1.8 is so bad and outdated it'll be dropped soon!

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

8 July 2015
And so too, the new Jazz I believe. Which leaves the UK Swindon factory just building Civics no one seems to want. One has to wonder if there is a future for a stand alone car plant with a capacity of 250,000 units just building around 100,000 cars per year. It's about time that Honda got its act together and started building cars that we Europeans actually want to buy.

12 July 2016
LP in Brighton wrote:

And so too, the new Jazz I believe. Which leaves the UK Swindon factory just building Civics no one seems to want. One has to wonder if there is a future for a stand alone car plant with a capacity of 250,000 units just building around 100,000 cars per year. It's about time that Honda got its act together and started building cars that we Europeans actually want to buy.

Honda is changing from a build-local sell-local model to a global reach. Pre-recession we lost the S2000, Integra and other more specialist models in part because of a change to that policy (emissions not withstanding).
With the continuing failure of the overall European market to fully recover, Honda will be sending 5dr Civics outside of Europe (and Australia).
This balances the load of future recessions across the globe (vs Localised) but puts more pressure to ensure each individual model sells throughout its lifespan. It's a tough call as to which is approach best but success of 5dr Civics in other markets may help protect Swindon against Brexit fallout.

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