Autocar staffers pick their best cars from the Geneva motor show, including the Bugatti Chiron, Jaguar F-Type SVR, Pagani Huayra BC and more
2 March 2016

The Geneva motor show has given us a close look at many of the new cars that will be coming to the UK over the next year, as well as a glimpse into the future of brands like DS, Vauxhall and VW.

With so many cars on display, we've selected the very best new metal. You can see more pictures of all these, and many other cars, in our Geneva show gallery.

Geneva motor show 2016: our show stars

Jim Holder - Jaguar F-Type SVR

Good enough to draw praise from VW  Group bigwigs - and they know a thing or two about building sportscar brands. This new halo Jaguar somehow manages to combine beauty and menace, and the spec sheet only makes the urge to drive it even greater.

Mark Tisshaw - Ford Fiesta ST200

An engineering masterpiece, one that sadly so few people will be able to experience because production will be limited to just a few hundred units. Yes, ladies and gentlemen, meet the star of the Geneva motor show: the Ford Fiesta ST200. What did you think I was talking about, the Bugatti Chiron?

Richard Bremner - Abarth 124 Rally

For sheer nostalgia it’s hard to top the new Abarth 124 Rally, an off-the-shelf rally car homologated for the FIA R-GT category and deeply redolent of the Abarth 124 that last officially competed in 1976. A 300bhp turbo 1800, six-speed sequential box, limited slip diff, a lowered centre-of-gravity and rear-drive promise plenty of opposite lock antics for the 2017 season.

Andrew Frankel - Aston Martin DB11

The DB11 didn’t so much steal the show as fling it in a bag marked ‘swag’ and run over the hills and far away with it. The DB11 is a perfect lesson to any car designer pondering how to stay faithful to a car’s heritage without being tied to it.

Jesse Crosse - Vauxhall/Opel GT concept

A back to basics sports car is badly needed today and the 1.0-litre turbo Vauxhall Opel GT concept delivers. A high-tech human machine interface and advanced voice control creates a clean interior, which doesn't distract and looks cool. Let's hope Opel is brave enough to make it.

Nic Cackett - Apollo Arrow

There were a lot of outlandish hi-end niche products at Geneva not worth the space on your driveway, but the Apollo Arrow prototype has a flicker of potential. Not only is it based on well-proven Gumpert tech, it also has a new Audi engine and a sensible(ish) vision. Place your bets.

Hilton Holloway - Fiat Tipo

Fiat’s capacious new Tipo was engineered and is built in Turkey in order to markedly undercut existing Focus-market models. It bravely offers unpretentious utility in a new car market where many mainstream makers are increasingly trying to extract premium price.

Steve Cropley - SsangYong SIV2

This concept is an accurate reflection of what the next Korando will be like, according to Ssangyong bosses who were present in Geneva. The new model's styling, which was chosen from a total of four proposals, was designed in-house at Ssangyong in Korea and pioneers a new C-segment platform likely also to be used by Ssangyong's parent, Mahindra.

Darren Moss - Pagani Huayra BC

I’ve always had a soft spot for the Pagani Huayra. Along with the original Veyron, it’s one of those bedroom poster cars. Property magnate Benny Caiola must feel pretty special to have this 740bhp special, billed as the most advanced Huayra yet, named after him.

Julian Rendell - Bugatti Chiron

The stand-out car at Geneva? The car we will remember? Bugatti’s outrageous, extraordinary, faintly absurd 1479bhp Chiron. I’ll never own one and probably will never drive one, but I love the fact that it exists.

Sam Sheehan - Renault Scenic

Kudos to Renault for doing something different. Rather than sticking with a safe, conventional design, it’s turned the Scenic – which, let’s face it, has long been fairly bland - into something much more sexy. It’s a practical car you can be proud of, and bodes very well for the car maker’s upcoming models.

Doug Revolta - DS E-Tense

DS needs a halo car, and it’s a shame it won’t be the E-Tense. An aggressive looking carbonfibre 400bhp electric supercar with a 200-mile range, it’d be a worthy range-topper and would go some way to establishing the brand away from Citroen. Here’s hoping the eventual halo model will be even better.

Mike Duff - Morgan EV3

No 1000bhp supercars for me – rather the electric Morgan, chosen as it made me smile more than anything else at the show. Losing the V-Twin engine should make the 3-Wheeler look ridiculous, but the EV3 is almost impossibly cute.

Greg Kable - Porsche 911 R

With the unveiling of the stripped out 911 R, Porsche has spectacularly answered criticism that it was losing touch with its most loyal customers.  With the 911 GT3 RS’s 493bhp naturally aspirated flat six, a six-speed manual gearbox, uniquely tuned chassis, a kerb weight of 1370kg, it recalls some of Porsche’s most famed motorsport derived 911 models. I can’t wait to drive it.

Matt Prior - McLaren 570GT

Every move McLaren makes is a positive one at the minute. And although the 570S is a brilliant road and track car already, a marginally softer, more habitable variant appeals. They’re small margins, and it has dynamism to spare.

Matt Burt - Touring Superleggera Disco Volante Spyder

So it turns out Touring Superleggera can do convertibles as well, as its first open-topped model attests. The carbonfibre twin roofs are detachable and can be stored in the boot, but if you’re well heeled enough to order one, chances are you live somewhere permanently warm anyway, so you won’t need them at all. You’d have to wait six months for the Italians to build a Disco Volante Spyder, but you’d drive it in the knowledge that it had been lovingly put together.

Read more Geneva motor show news

Our Verdict

Jaguar F-type R coupé
The F-type R coupé is powered by a supercharged 5.0-litre V8 engine that offers 542bhp and 502lb ft of torque

Most powerful Jaguar F-type coupé is sensational to drive, with even better driving dynamics than its convertible sibling

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Comments
5

2 March 2016
'Property magnate Benny Caiola must feel pretty special to have this 740bhp special, billed as the most advanced Huayra yet, named after him.' I don't think he'll be feeling much at all, Darren, seeing as he died six years ago.

2 March 2016
According to Autocar, Fiat Tipo pricing will either "markedly undercut" or "remain close to" the Focus. So, which is it? Given the discounts readily available on many cars in this class, it may struggle in the UK without a significant price advantage.

rxl

2 March 2016
Fiat Tipo, Renault Scenic? are this show stars to you?? God, your level of journalism is getting worst day bay day...

3 March 2016
rxl wrote:
Fiat Tipo, Renault Scenic? are this show stars to you?? God, your level of journalism is getting worst day bay day...
Jeez man, the article is clearly headed *OUR* star cars, the guys are allowed an opinion. As are you. Very little to do with journalistic skill.

4 March 2016
My favourites from Geneva 2016 - 1) Bentley Mulsanne Mulliner 2) And the lonely Tata Tiago (a spirtual successor to the utterly unsuccessful CityRover, if anyone remembers it!)

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