New government won't abolish the £5000 low-carbon car grant - but the scheme is now worth 80% less

The coalition government has committed to honouring the previous government's £5000 ‘Plug-In Car Grant’ - but the scheme is now around 80 per cent less generous, opposition politicians have claimed.

The grant, confirmed today by transport secretary Philip Hammond, will launch in January 2011 and offers up to £5000 towards motorists buying an electric, plug-in hybrid or hydrogen fuel cell car. The scheme will initially run until March 2012 and there will be a review in January 2012.

Read Autocar's first drive of the Toyota Prius Plug-In

Speaking at the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, Hammond said, “The coalition government is absolutely committed to low carbon growth, tackling climate change and making our energy supply more secure.

“We are sending a clear signal that Britain is open for business and that we are committed to greening our economy. This will ensure that the UK is a world leader in low-emissions vehicles."

But the scheme is worth £43 million, much less than the £230 million originally promised by Labour. Labour's shadow transport secretary Sadiq Khan said there had been no plan to review the scheme after a year under its plans and claimed "the coalition must show greater ambition than this" if Britain is to attract more manufacturers to building low-carbon vehicles in the UK.

The amount of money committed by the coalition is enough for grants for up to 8,600; under Labour's plans, the grants could have funded almost 50,000 cars. However, a Department for Transport spokesman said the coalition scheme's first year funding was a match for Labour's plans.

SMMT chief executive Paul Everitt said Britain was now well placed to lead in the emerging market for ultra-low-carbon vehicles.

"The UK is well placed to exploit the global opportunities in the transition to low-carbon technologies and is already making significant progress through R&D, the low-carbon supply chain and vehicle manufacturing," he said.

“The Automotive Council has set some ambitious objectives and today's announcement is an important step in helping to attract new investment and laying the foundations for thousands of new high-skill jobs.”

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Comments
13

28 July 2010

[quote Autocar]The coalition government is absolutely committed to low carbon growth - negative economic growth, tackling climate change - foisting the scam of Global Warming on you, like the last shower, and making our energy supply more secure - making gas and electricity bills rise another 50% in the next 5 years.

“We are sending a clear signal that Britain is open for business - we are sending a clear signal that Britain is open to every crook usuror, to exploit the British people in a known BigSix energy cartel, and that we are committed to greening our economy - and we are committed to greening our already sap people, with even more BS like this. This will ensure that the UK is a world leader in low emission vehicles.- this will ensure future generations will look back and despair at how their ancestors were taken for a ride”

[/quote]

On the same day the coalition of all the expense fraudsters signs the British up to shelling out hundreds of millions of pounds to foreign corporations for overpriced milkfloats 'British' Gas announces its usurious profits - the wholesale price of natural gas has fallen by two-thirds since 2008 - and the price of electricity and gas will rise from their already extortionate levels by another 50% in the coming years to pay for windmills and more usurious profits of EdF, E.ON, RWE, GdF and Centrica. Someone has to stop this criminal activity.

28 July 2010

Probably time to look up 'usurious' in a dictionary now, old chap.... Otherwise is it not likely that a very high proportion of these subsidised electric vehicles will be bought not as replacement vehicles for polluting old wrecks but as 3rd or 4th cars by rather well-heeled Londoners who are merely keen to avoid parking and congestion charges? As these can easily run to £40-50 a day in the centre of town they will see a relatively quick return, particularly if the first £5k is underwritten by Terry Taxpayer.

28 July 2010

[quote WFC Holden]3rd or 4th cars by rather well-heeled Londoners who are merely keen to avoid parking and congestion charges? As these can easily run to £40-50 a day in the centre of town they will see a relatively quick return, particularly if the first £5k is underwritten by Terry Taxpayer.[/quote]

So UK is London and London is UK now? Or rather London is anything but UK. If London is so special and needs UK taxpayer grants to overcome its self-imposed car-usage charges, here's an idea, have London, or let's cut to the chase, eh, have the City of London, its tax-evading Brits and foreigners, wider rich-London crims-on-the-run, and non-doms declare UDI and pay for their own subsidies. How about that?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/property/article-1295924/Buy-20m--pay-stamp-duty-How-Candy-brothers-advised-foreign-buyers-avoid-millions-tax-luxury-flats.html

I'm sure with some of the millions these diversity-enriching foreigners and 'English' businessmen have saved in their stamp tax evasion they can afford to buy UK taxpayer unsubsidised a £40k Yank milkfloat.

28 July 2010

Dutchmaestro, your quoting your own, highly biased version of what was written by Autocar in the 2nd post is disengenuous to your arguament.

If of course you don't like the UK and live there, you could always leave the country.

I did.

Nobody is forcing you to stay are they?

28 July 2010

Not mentioned that the number of grants has been slashed from a minimum of 46,000 to as few as 8,600.

28 July 2010

it might be good for national business, but i dont think it's good for cars or the future of cars.

i would rather see the £5k discount just for hydrogen or hybrid cars, excluding big battery pack cars.

The £5k discount for plug in cars could be delayed until they are proven worthy of investing in. The concept and technolgy and materials as they are are no good at all, with the zero emissions being balanced by a waste of resources.

28 July 2010

[quote beachland2]i would rather see the £5k discount just for hydrogen or hybrid cars, excluding big battery pack cars.[/quote]

I agree with that, actually. It's just a pity that investment on hydrogen cars appears to be so much lower than electric cars.

28 July 2010

[quote beachland2]

i would rather see the £5k discount just for hydrogen or hybrid cars, excluding big battery pack cars.

[/quote]

Hydrogen cars are still many years off, if ever. Electric and range extending cars are here now.

There are apparently still major issues with the cars let alone the problem of 'producing' hydrogen, which is very expensive.

28 July 2010

Probably a more accurate edit is:

[quote Autocar]Speaking at the SMMT, Hammond said, “The coalition government is absolutely committed to looking good in front of other deluded greenies at climate change conferences they have all jetted around the world to, and gesture politics like this are the most cost-effective way of giving the illusion of doing something without actually having to achieve anything[/quote]

28 July 2010

[quote Lee23404]Hydrogen cars are still many years off, if ever. [/quote]

Honda says it may begin mass production of its FCX Clarity hydrogen fuel cell car in... 2018. England will have won the World Cup before there's a fuelcell car on sale.

[quote Lee23404]There are apparently still major issues with the cars [/quote]

er, cost?

'There were reports that previous generation fuel-cell cars from Honda cost more than $1 million to build in 2005. Some estimated that Honda had cut its production costs to between $120,000 and $140,000 per vehicle.'

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=a693eL42oJHo

Still, if Tesla can get away with asking €130,000 for a motorised pedal car maybe Honda could make a go of $140,000 fuelcell Accords.

Fuelcells have been around for decades, semi-commercially. Like batteries they've never had a step-change in cost, down to the levels that would make them economic against ICEs. More pie in the sky nonsense.

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