RAC Foundation believes charging motorists is inevitable if traffic problems are to be avoided

Charging motorists based on their mileage is inevitable if future traffic problems are to be avoided, according to the RAC Foundation.

A “pay-as-you-go” system could be the answer to congestion, says its director professor Stephen Glaister.

A 33 per cent increase in traffic by 2025, combined with spending cuts and a lack of vision for the road network will necessitate wholesale reform, he says.

The launch of the report coincided with an Ipsos MORI study showing 58 per cent of drivers agreed a per-mile system would make them think about how much they drive.

“Most people are instinctively opposed to road charging when they think it is an extra tax,” said Glaister. “But when the details are explained … the opposition falls away dramatically.”

The report also recommended a cut in fuel duty and road tax, a governing body to develop and implement a long-term strategy for the road network, a guaranteed sum of revenue for the work, a regulator to ensure the work was done efficiently and more reliable journey times and compensation for delays

In 2005, the then transport secretary Alistair Darling backed a plan to force motorists to pay £1.30 a mile to drive on Britain’s busiest roads.

Andrew Papworth

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27

6 July 2010

My biggest concern about road charging is that it would just be used as another excuse to bully people with larger vehicles and to force is into little city cars.

Why can't we just be left to drive where we want? I much prefer it when I'm over in America and I can jump in the car, go where I want and do what I want when I want without having to worry about the cost all the time. In this country you constantly find yourself weighing up the cost of fuel then judging whether the journey is worthwhile or whether you should just stay at home. What a wonderful way that we are forced to live.

6 July 2010

[quote fhp11] I much prefer it when I'm over in America and I can jump in the car, go where I want and do what I want when I want without having to worry about the cost all the time. In this country you constantly find yourself weighing up the cost of fuel then judging whether the journey is worthwhile or whether you should just stay at home. What a wonderful way that we are forced to live.[/quote]

and thats why america is drowning in its own oil and we are not.

the UK is a small country it doesnt have enough space for our high population.

America has the space and freedom, but also a false freedom of cost to drive around, when oil runs out and all Americans need to buy their resources from other superpowers, everything will be a sudden shock to the whole US economy, which may make it collapse through lack of mobility.

6 July 2010

All this road charging talk is stupid. We already have a system where we pay per mile, and the charge is variable depending on the size and efficiency of the vehicle we drive. It is called MASSIVE taxation on fuel. So why bother wasting millions, probably billions of Pounds on a system we already have?

Under Labour I can imagine it was a way to spy on and control people (i.e. fine them) and to employ many people in pointless jobs and award vast contracts of public money to private sector donors, I mean carefully selected partners ... thankfully this is just the RAC spouting. However, to hear it come from a motoring organisation suggests the RAC have now won a preferred motoring callout service provider contract available at a discounted rate to Labour party members. I am not a cynic, I have just lived in the UK too long.

6 July 2010

[quote Autocar]Charging motorists based on their mileage is inevitable if future traffic problems are to be avoided, according to the RAC Foundation.[/quote]Is that the RAC, an organisation founded to serve and protect the interests of the motorist, preparing us for more taxation?

Has the good professor not seen Murray's T25 - three to a lane and parking bay? Has he not noticed the rise in sales of small premium cars? Is his alarm over congestion a UK problem or merely middle-England and central London? I think we should be told.

6 July 2010

[quote Cheltenhamshire]Under Labour I can imagine it was a way to spy on and control people [/quote]Under Thatcher we had the spy satellite, Zircon. Being a forthright, direct speaking politician she happily lied to her voters denying it existed. It was estimated it added over £100 million annually to intelligence surveillance costs, in perpetuity.

6 July 2010

I totally agree if it was introduced it would be all well and good with super cheap fuel n RFL however come the next budget we'll have crippling fuel tax or stupid Road Tax or increase in road prices which would mean every1 is worse off and food prices go up ect ect. It would be used to stealth tax people, something Labour have been very very good at.

Hopefully tories will see that it is unnecessary and at the end of the day we all pay per mile.

As traffic gets worse people are trying to find alternative means of transport but the public transport is stupid and expensive, cycling isnt very safe and you turn up at workn sweating like a pig and every1 avoiding you like the plague.

6 July 2010

[quote fhp11]

My biggest concern about road charging is that it would just be used as another excuse to bully people with larger vehicles and to force is into little city cars.

[/quote]

There are a lot of bigger diesel cars such a BMW 3 and 5 Series, Merc C and E Class and Audis, Passats, Skoda Superbs, Volvos, Citoen C5s and Mondeos who's economy figures will embarrass many a city car. If the need for a more economical car stuck me in any of them I wouldn't feel sorry for myself.

6 July 2010

If companies offered shower facilities I'm sure the more athletic workers would commute via bike, maybe even as much as 20 or 30 miles. I don't know how long it takes to get in big city centres from 20 miles but on a bike it would average about an hour.

Personally I see toll charging as just another way to rob the population of yet more precious money.

6 July 2010

[quote Autocar]Charging motorists based on their mileage is inevitable if future traffic problems are to be avoided, according to the RAC Foundation.
[/quote]

I agree that it is inevitable. However, I think that the real reason is that the government will need new ways to raise taxes from motorists as electric vehicles proliferate and cars use less fuel per mile. They are simply moving to cover electric vehicle drivers avoiding paying any tax and having a huge number of drivers suddenly switching to EVs, creating a taxation shortfall...

6 July 2010

It's fairer on UK based transport companies, who are fighting a loosing battle against foreign transport companies who can make money off UK roads without making any contribution to their upkeep.

If the system had the flexibility to vary charges according to day/time - it could also reduce conjestion by enouraging drivers to make their journey during quieter (cheaper) times.

However I am also very wary that the system could be abused.

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