Potential manufacturers are bidding for Murray city car contract, with a decision due by June

Gordon Murray Design is close to finalising a deal that will allow his revolutionary T25 and T27 city cars to enter production.

The legendary designer told Autocar that advanced talks had taken place with three potential suitors over a licence to build the cars, and he hoped a deal could be sealed by June.

The three interested parties are competing for a licence to produce the T25 and T27 using Murray’s iStream manufacturing process. Its efficiency, investment and space savings will allow cars to be made for much less than existing or proposed city cars. Both would be built on the same production line.

One of the groups is a start-up UK-based consortium, another is an existing European manufacturer and the third is an overseas-based start-up consortium. Once an iStream licence is granted to one of the companies to build the petrol-powered T25 and its all-electric T27 sibling, no other licences would be granted.

Murray confirmed he is working on six other projects that could be built using the iStream process, ranging from two seats to 13. “These are all different types of vehicles with different bodystyles and powertrains,” he said.

“The T25 was built by us to showcase the iStream technology, whereas the other six projects have all been people approaching us for an iStream licence to build a certain type of vehicle.

“The T25 and T27 have been byproducts of demonstrating the manufacturing process, so it’s great that there is so much interest in them. We know we really need to get these manufactured now, though.”

Late last month Murray entered into a technical partnership with Japanese carbonfibre specialist Toray Industries, the firm that commissioned him to develop the Teewave AR.1 two-seat electric sports car for last year’s Tokyo motor show.

Mark Tisshaw

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Comments
105

8 February 2012

As a fan of the small car, I can't wait to see how this project progresses and what the finished article will look like (surely the styling will change!? ).

8 February 2012

I look forward to when one of the team can take one for a drive,

me thinks it will be rather good.

As for the way the car looks,i have no problem with that,if it comes

on the market at £6k,top speed 94mph and 93 mpg,T25, as we have

been told it could well do, i think it will do well.

8 February 2012

Oh, looking forward to seeing this in production! Gordon Murray - Genuis.

9 February 2012

So why tell the press? It isn't really a story until the deal is done.

9 February 2012

[quote LP in Brighton]

So why tell the press? It isn't really a story until the deal is done.

[/quote]

It's all about putting pressure on the people in the running for the rights.

As the report says, there are three interested parties and publicising that may generate interest from other areas.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

9 February 2012

[quote LP in Brighton]So why tell the press?[/quote]Could be to counter idle gossip and innuendo that permeates the Internet. When the final deal is signed and the winner announced we will go through another torrent of negative chatter telling us how the car will never sell.

Whenever I look back at my Smart and see it has taken up only half of a parking bay I'm reminded Murray's invention can get three on a bay and yet it can hold two passengers. And I smile.

9 February 2012

But LA, as I've said before "fat bottomed girls" need not apply, the seats are tiny, make the Smart seats look like thrones !

9 February 2012

[quote Ravon]"fat bottomed girls" [/quote]

The driver's seat seems comfortable - not sat in it - but then, he isn't making the vehicle or dressing it. The production company will do that and I'm certain give it the pizzazz it badly needs to attract.

9 February 2012

[quote Los Angeles]Whenever I look back at my Smart and see it has taken up only half of a parking bay I'm reminded Murray's invention can get three on a bay and yet it can hold two passengers. And I smile.[/quote]

How many people want a car that small though? And how will its price compare with a small "normal" hatchback like a Citroen C1/Hyundai i10 or similar. Looking at the pictures the Murray design cars look more like a competitor to the Renault Twizzy.

9 February 2012

[quote Maxycat]How many people want a car that small though? [/quote]

As I said earlier, after all the negative comments about how no one will want to put it into production, wait for the torrent of negative comments suggesting when produced it won't sell.

How many people want to buy a fake "Bugatti, or a McLaren? Enough it seems to make 'em. In contrast, the T25 is cheap as chips to make, making risk negligible. It will depend on how well it drives, how cheap to buy and service, but above all, if its claimed miracle mpg stands up to real world use.

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