Cost-conscious buyers turn to diesel to beat high fuel prices

Sales of diesel cars in Britain have overtaken those of petrol for the first time, according to the latest survey of the Society of Motoring Manufactures and Traders (SMMT).

Diesel car sales have increased by 11.8 per cent year-on-year to take a 50.6 per cent market share, mainly boosted by drivers trying to beat the all time high fuel prices.

Petrol car registrations, which benefitted most from the scrappage scheme, have plunged by 13.2 per cent year-on-year.

Alternatively fuelled vehicles such as hybrids also enjoyed record highs this July, rising by 52.6 per cent to take a 1.4 per cent market share.

The SMMT predicts that 2.018 million new car units will be sold in 2010, an increase of 1.2 per cent over 2009.

Alex Kersten

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82

6 August 2010

I wonder what percentage of those diesel buyers might have actually been better off (financially) with petrol?

I've just bought a petrol 1.8 Avensis. Mid-30s around town, mid-40s on the motorway. Petrol is cheaper than diesel, there's no DPF or high pressure fuel system to worry about and the car was *much* cheaper to buy than even the lowest powered diesel version. It's only 2 tax bands higher than the diesel too.

Plus I don't do many miles either. Petrol for me. How many others should be buying petrol but aren't?

6 August 2010

about 50.6% of the overall car buying population too many i would say.

6 August 2010

First Beachy, then Dan, then FINALLY the motoring journalists! Jeez, guys... talk about slow on the uptake. Bunch of incompetent Freemasons.

6 August 2010

The days where you had to cover over 20k miles a year to break even for diesel have long gone. Even if the car never moves out of your driveway, a diesel engine which falls into or under the £35 road tax threshold should make the better buy. No wonder diesel sales are overtaking petrol.

6 August 2010

[quote ronmcdonald]The days where you had to cover over 20k miles a year to break even for diesel have long gone. Even if the car never moves out of your driveway, a diesel engine which falls into or under the £35 road tax threshold should make the better buy. No wonder diesel sales are overtaking petrol.[/quote]

Pretty soon the Govt will realise the CO2 myth no longer holds water and they'll start taxing cars on NOx (a real pollutant). Then we'll see diseasals wiped off the face of the planet as the polluting, unreliable, outdated heaps of junk they are.

6 August 2010

[quote Oilburner]

I wonder what percentage of those diesel buyers might have actually been better off (financially) with petrol?

I've just bought a petrol 1.8 Avensis. Mid-30s around town, mid-40s on the motorway. Petrol is cheaper than diesel, there's no DPF or high pressure fuel system to worry about and the car was *much* cheaper to buy than even the lowest powered diesel version. It's only 2 tax bands higher than the diesel too.

Plus I don't do many miles either. Petrol for me. How many others should be buying petrol but aren't?

[/quote]

Good point Oilburner! Does make you wonder how many people have been sucked into this myth that they will save money even though they do less than 10k a year. It's nice to see so many decent petrol lumps coming out these days with mid 40's MPG combined figures.

I've been driving an Octavia Scout diesel for the past 3 years - I do around 20k a year & average 47-50mpg on the M/way which makes up for about 70% of my travel - If I can achieve similar figures to this from a petrol with similar power & with the bonus of having part time 4WD (I live on a farm & it comes in handy from time to time) I wouldn't even hesitate in buying a petrol equivalent - it just isn't quite there yet!

Some boring info for you to yawn at - The gap between Petrol & diesel price has increased slightly over recent years as a result of economics (supply & demand etc...) although it's not increased that much to the punter at the pumps - something like a 3p gap as opposed to 2p ten years ago, however, it still pulls in a pretty hefty amount when you add up all those pence per litres for the Government/oil companies. Any guess what this gap will be in a couple of years from now? 5p, 6p?

6 August 2010

[quote ronmcdonald]The days where you had to cover over 20k miles a year to break even for diesel have long gone. Even if the car never moves out of your driveway, a diesel engine which falls into or under the £35 road tax threshold should make the better buy. No wonder diesel sales are overtaking petrol.[/quote]

i dont think this is true.

6 August 2010

[quote beachland2]

[quote ronmcdonald]The days where you had to cover over 20k miles a year to break even for diesel have long gone. Even if the car never moves out of your driveway, a diesel engine which falls into or under the £35 road tax threshold should make the better buy. No wonder diesel sales are overtaking petrol.[/quote]

i dont think this is true.

[/quote]

It depends on your own situation and the car. If you lease or buy on PCP with the intention of giving it back after 3 years then a diesel is much cheaper, even if it never turns a wheel. A 1.4T Audi A3 Sportback was nearly a £100 a month more to have than the 2.0tdi I ordered.

If you are buying outright and don't do many miles then a petrol is probably cheaper.

Then you have to consider the different characteristics of the cars. I prefer the easily accessible torque of a diesel to the revvy nature of a petrol. What value do you out on that?

I think people just have to make up their own minds about what's best for them.

6 August 2010

[quote ronmcdonald] Even if the car never moves out of your driveway, a diesel engine which falls into or under the £35 road tax threshold should make the better buy. No wonder diesel sales are overtaking petrol.[/quote]

Yeah right. You've obviously never experienced a DPF clogging up because you've been spending too long driving around town, presented for a bill for a new high pressure fuel injector/pump etc, or lost a stack on a diesel purchase after being told that "it'll hold its value better than the petrol", when it didn't...

6 August 2010

[quote Lee23404]I prefer the easily accessible torque of a diesel to the revvy nature of a petrol.[/quote]

quite a few figures i have read this year show the petrol turbos making more lower down peak torque than the diesels. from 1700rpm peak torque in the petrols on some. surely 1700rpm is not revvy or inaccessible?

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