The Department of Transport wants to reduce uneccessary street furniture

Councils are being urged to remove unnecessary street furniture and signs in order to make urban streets more accessible and safer for motorists and pedestrians.

The Department of Transport is advising local policy makers to reduce the number of signs and other ‘street clutter’ such as railings, advertising hoardings and painted lines.

The government believes that traffic signs and railings are being installed by councils in the mistaken belief that they are legally required.

Communities secretary Eric Pickles and transport secretary Philip Hammond are concerned the character of the country’s urban spaces is being damaged.

Hammond said: "We all know that some signs are necessary to make our roads safe and help traffic flow freely. But unnecessary street furniture is a waste of taxpayers' money and leaves our streets looking more like scrap yards than public spaces.

"We have written to councils to remind them that it need not be this way – we don't need all this clutter confusing motorists, obstructing pedestrians and hindering those with disabilities who are trying to navigate our streets.

The government is also concerned that too many signs compromise safety as important warning signs have less of an impact when surrounded by other street furniture.

Tony Burton, the director of Civic Voice, claimed that after street clutter was removed from Kensington High Street accidents have been reduced by 47 per cent.Ministers want communities to inform local authorities of particularly bad examples of clutter.

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Comments
12

27 August 2010

About time the out of control roads departments of local councils were brought back into line.

Next can we remove all the car-damaging bumps they've put in? And how about the ridiculous over use of 20mph zones?

27 August 2010

And if we could only remove unnecessary Councils as well then maybe the traffic would flow freely again.


27 August 2010

[quote Johnny English]And if we could only remove unnecessary Councils as well then maybe the traffic would flow freely again.[/quote]And if we remove traffic our streets will become safe again...

27 August 2010

Shock! Horror! Common sense! Almost...

Way too many flashing signs around here along with those silly coloured surfaces that apart from looking gaudy start to break up 30 minutes after the council lay it.

Wouldn't be at all surprised if the amount of this questinable "safety feature" being laid is in direct correlation to the amount of the budget surplus.

Seriously it is welcome as there is obviously no central co-ordination for this proliferation. Not around Reading anyway.

src

28 August 2010

Edinburgh Council should start with getting rid of the bleeping trams !!!!

28 August 2010

all the 20mph zones i know are very well judged.

speed humps should be banned, i would rather there were cheap digital average speed cameras for zones where humps are built.

28 August 2010

[quote src]Edinburgh Council should start with getting rid of the bleeping trams !!!![/quote] What an excellent idea. Let's put the kibosh on an economic, environmentally sound and proven system of local public transport before it's even started. Works plenty well enough in plenty of European cities.

28 August 2010

[quote beachland2]speed humps should be banned, i would rather there were cheap digital average speed cameras for zones where humps are built.
[/quote]

I would too but average speed cameras are too expensive and too difficult to implement in many estates where humps are present.

The flashing speed signs are daft too. Not in respect of whether they work or not (I have no idea but doubt they do) but in regards to their price: crica £10k per sign!

I've seen a great way of slowing people down in Portugal. On the approach to some towns from a fast A or B road, there is a speed detector that monitors the speed of approaching cars. Go too fast and the traffic light not long after the speed reduction sign turns to red. Stick at the town speed limit, it'll stay at green. You have to stay slow for some distance in order for it not to go red.

And it works. Really well. People ignore speed limits daily. Very very few people drive straight through red lights, regardless of how pointless they appear.

Reducing the excess in information at the road side is a great move. We need to spend less time telling each other what to do all the time.

The comments section needs a makeover... how about a forum??

28 August 2010

[quote Rich_uk]I've seen a great way of slowing people down in Portugal. On the approach to some towns from a fast A or B road, there is a speed detector that monitors the speed of approaching cars. Go too fast and the traffic light not long after the speed reduction sign turns to red. Stick at the town speed limit, it'll stay at green. You have to stay slow for some distance in order for it not to go red.[/quote] Very interesting idea indeed Not come across that before. Do you have any links to it?

28 August 2010

that's a good idea possibly.

any solution that doesn't involve seriously wearing out or damaging car suspension.

it's scientific fact that more children die in india making replacement suspension springs and dampers in factories than children hit by cars in residential areas. there is no real evidence for that, but it is scientific fact.

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