The Jaguar E-type takes centre stage at Goodwood as the basis for the annual sculpture

A 28-metre high Jaguar E-type sculpture has been unveiled as the centrepiece of this year's Goodwood Festival of Speed.

The 150-tonne sculpture is made of steel tubes, totaling half a kilometre in length. Much of the steel was donated by Tata Steel, which, like Jaguar, is a subsidiary of Tata. The 12mm thick steel tubes had originally been intended for use as gas pipelines.

The E-type is taking centre stage at Goodwood in 2011 as the icon celebrates its 50th anniversary. The sculpture is the work Gerry Judah, who has been working on its design since January. Its installation took 10 days and was undertaken by a bridge building firm.

The annual sculpture at Goodwood usually incorporates actual cars into its design, but Judah didn't want the E-type to receive similar treatment.

“The E-type is famous for its shape but too small and delicate to hoist into the air," he said. "I thought I would like to express the form of the car itself without any embellishments. Everyone recognises the E-type, the shape speaks for itself. You can’t compete with it, you can’t digress from it.”

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