Mk7 version of the GTI available with either 217bhp or 227bhp turbocharged 2.0-litre engine

Volkswagen will give the new Golf GTI Mk7 its American debut at the New York motor show. It arrives in the UK this June and will be available in the USA next year.

The final specification of the production car was confirmed at the Geneva motor show, and the hot hatch is nearly identical to the ‘concept’ version shown last autumn.

Two versions of the car will be offered: a 217bhp standard car and a 227bhp Performance Package version, a first for the Golf GTI. A turbocharged 2.0-litre petrol engine with 258lb ft is used in both cars.

A six-speed manual gearbox is standard in both cars, with a six-speed dual-clutch automatic available as an option. The standard GTI can crack 0-62mph in 6.5sec and reach a 153mph top speed. 

Both cars share the same 47.1mpg combined economy, 139g/km CO2 emissions and 1276kg kerb weight.

The Performance Package cuts 0.1sec off the 0-62mph time and adds 2mph at the top end.

The GTI gets a lowered sports chassis, twin exhaust tailpipes, 17-inch ‘Brooklyn’ alloys and a body kit with wider sills and integrated rear diffuser. Cabin features include a sports steering wheel and pedals, plus traditional plaid sports seats.

Standard models get 314mm ventilated front discs and 300mm rear unventilated discs. Performance Package versions feature ventilated disc brakes all round, 342mm at the front and 310mm at the rear.

Prices for the new VW Golf GTI are yet to be confirmed but are expected to start at around £26,000 for the three-door manual version and £27,500 for the DSG-equipped version.

Five-door models will likely command a premium of around £650, while the Performance Package should cost in the region of £1,000.

Volkswagen has also confirmed the specification of a new GTD model, which largely shares its looks with the GTI. Power comes from a 181bhp, 280lb ft 2.0 TDI engine.

Equipped with a standard six-speed manual gearbox, it can crack 0-62mph in 7.5sec on its way to a 137mph top speed. Combined economy is rated at 67.3mpg and CO2 emissions are just 109g/km.

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Comments
34

27 February 2013

 

There must be some weight saving on the performance version to keep the same kerb wieght as the bigger front and rear discs will be  more heavy.

Can Autocar find find out what this is?

 

 

 

27 February 2013

supertax wrote:

 

There must be some weight saving on the performance version to keep the same kerb wieght as the bigger front and rear discs will be  more heavy.

Can Autocar find find out what this is?

 

Perhaps the calipers on the larger discs are made from a slightly lighter material, or they could shave a millimeter off the floor carpets to save a few grammes. I have it on good authority that the performance version has lighter number plates as well.

 

 

 

 

27 February 2013

Much more likely is that VAG, as usual, does not bother to provide correct weight figures. Anyway, no-one in the magazine business bothers to verify them.

I positively guarantee you that no GTI on the road will be close to that quoted weight. 1276kg? 1400 will be much closer to the truth.

27 February 2013

In the mean time I noticed the input from supertax which confirms both.

In other countries VW quotes 1351kg for the GTO - but without driver etc. All other car companies quote the weight according to EU 95/48/EC, including 75kg of driver & luggage.

So truthfully VW should mention 1426 kg, plus the weight of options. Real cars will thus be closer to 1500kg. But 1276 sound more impressive, and apprently VAG's buying public is too stupid to understand anyway.

27 February 2013

supertax wrote:

 

There must be some weight saving on the performance version to keep the same kerb wieght as the bigger front and rear discs will be  more heavy.

Can Autocar find find out what this is?

 

Bit of a daft remark...if nothing else, ventilated discs are likely to be lighter than a slightly smaller solid disc...

 

 

 

27 February 2013

Sketchley wrote:

 

Bit of a daft remark...if nothing else, ventilated discs are likely to be lighter than a slightly smaller solid disc...

 

 310mm vented will weigh more than a 300mm solid.

A 310mm vented rear disc weighs 6.8kgs.

In comparison a 300mm solid weighs 5.2kgs.

Thats 3.2kgs added to rear axle alone.

342mm vents weigh about 11kgs each. 314mm vents weigh 8.4kgs.

Thats about 6kgs to front axle added.

So about 11kgs extra kerbweight on the performance version from brakes alone.

I'm not daft.

 

 

 

 

 

27 February 2013

supertax wrote:

Sketchley wrote:

Bit of a daft remark...if nothing else, ventilated discs are likely to be lighter than a slightly smaller solid disc...

 342mm vents weigh about 11kgs each. 314mm vents weigh 8.4kgs.

Blimey a vented disc weigh's 11kgs, they should put carbon brakes on the options list

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

27 February 2013

supertax wrote:

There must be some weight saving on the performance version to keep the same kerb wieght as the bigger front and rear discs will be  more heavy.

Can Autocar find find out what this is?

It's pretty unlikely there'll be any difference on the spec sheet, despite the theoretical weight differences. The cars will get homologated the same. Exactly the same thing happened with the Nissan GT-R Track Pack which, despite having various weight saving bits like lighter wheels and no rear seats, shares the same official kerb weight with the regular GT-R.


27 February 2013

So... if you want the 5 door with DSG and Sports Package, you are looking at £29k before options. It is starting to sound a little pricey to me. I have to say I am not convinced by the package and the slightly bland looks. And at £30k, that interior looks cheap. 

 

27 February 2013

marj wrote:

So... if you want the 5 door with DSG and Sports Package, you are looking at £29k before options. It is starting to sound a little pricey to me. I have to say I am not convinced by the package and the slightly bland looks. And at £30k, that interior looks cheap. 

 

 

You are right with the pricing of this car and this is where the Golf brand seems to be heading.  What with the VW portfolio consisting of the Skoda and SEAT brands essentially addressing the cheaper market share, you can see why the group have decided to market the Golf as the more upmarket car.  Right or wrong, it has the heritage and the history.  Must say I do like those wheels although it's all looking a little SEAT from the rear

 

 

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