Latest spy pics of the new Ferrari 599 ahead of its Geneva show debut
16 January 2012

Underneath this heavily-disguised Ferrari mule is the new 700bhp replacement for the Ferrari 599. Spied in the raods around Ferrari's Maranello base, the new model is only weeks away from its official debut at the Geneva motor show in March.

The new supercar will be the most powerful road car in Maranello’s history, possibly producing as much as 700bhp. “If you look at where we went from the F430 to the 458, and from the 612 Scaglietti to the FF, it is not hard to see where we want the next 599 to be,” said one insider close to the project. “We are not looking for a small step.”

Another source said it would be very surprising if the car did not have “at least” 700bhp. Given that the FF motor is now rated at 651bhp, a clear 120bhp ahead of the 612 Scaglietti, and that the current 599 GTB has 612bhp in standard tune, 700bhp is clearly technically possible.

Read Autocar's first drive of the new Ferrari FF

The new 599 will be powered by the next generation of the direct-injection 6.3-litre V12 used in the FF, an engine based on the original 599/Enzo unit and capable of 850bhp in the FXX Evoluzione.

Ferrari’s new flagship will also feature breakthrough structural and detailed engineering design to ensure that it is lighter than the model it replaces. The shedding of weight has started with the FF, which, despite its all-wheel drive hardware, has an almost identical kerb weight to the 612 Scaglietti’s.

Read the first drive of the new Ferrari 599 GTO

These weight savings will have to be delivered by Ferrari’s alloy monocoque body and not carbonfibre, which has been the route pursued by Lamborghini and McLaren. “The story of aluminium is not yet told,” said our source. Ferrari believes that carbonfibre is not yet suitable for the kind of volume production required for the 599 replacement.

Ferrari has also hinted very strongly that the 599 will stick with a rear-drive layout. The company sees its new four-wheel drive system as “best suited to our grand touring cars”, a category that doesn’t include the 599. However, Ferrari is on the record as saying that the system is destined for more than one car, with the next-generation California being the most likely recipient.

See all the latest Ferrari 599 reviews, news and video

Our Verdict

The Ferrari 599 offers mind-blowing pace and handling. Quite possibly the best Ferrari of its generation

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Comments
49

jer

11 April 2011

As my 2 year old says " I want more!"

Fal

11 April 2011

Shouldn't there be an Enzo replacement/F70 next year ?

11 April 2011

[quote jer]

As my 2 year old says " I want more!"

[/quote] But do we really need more...

507

11 April 2011

Ferrari for whom?

Having driven both the 430 and the 458 on German motorways I begin to wonder for whom these kind of cars are made. The first five minutes are fascinating, the next half hour a bit fun, but then you feel terribly uncomfortable, rattles here and there which weren´t there in the first place etc. At about 140mph in the overtaking lane the cars starts to make sense but you are then burning energy at the rate of a fighter pilot in combat.

In the larger european cities with one speed bump in three hits the car. Around Nordschleife the road tyres get too soft after a few minutes if you drive the way it is meant to be driven! On racing tyres it becomes a different car, but then the chassis starts to show its road settings and the whole thing becomes dangerous unless you are a very, very skilled racing driver.

This is of course not specific to Ferrari but all these super cars seem to be increasingly tailor made for "Top Gear". Of all the people I know dreaming of Ferraris practically nobody has even sat in one, let alone driven one! The Ferrari-owning friends I have use their cars 3 - 4 times a year, seldom enough for the battery to be flat. In one case a Ferrar owner has just bought a BMW M1 coupé as "fun car" but both he and his wife say they would rather have an M1 coupé each + the new M5 than keep the Ferrari which is never used.

11 April 2011

The 599 replacement will have 7 speed DCT, alluminium body, 6.3 V12 with direct iniection...no great surprises, what I'm really waiting to see are the looks...

11 April 2011

[quote 507]

Ferrari for whom?

Having driven both the 430 and the 458 on German motorways I begin to wonder for whom these kind of cars are made. The first five minutes are fascinating, the next half hour a bit fun, but then you feel terribly uncomfortable, rattles here and there which weren´t there in the first place etc. At about 140mph in the overtaking lane the cars starts to make sense but you are then burning energy at the rate of a fighter pilot in combat.

In the larger european cities with one speed bump in three hits the car. Around Nordschleife the road tyres get too soft after a few minutes if you drive the way it is meant to be driven! On racing tyres it becomes a different car, but then the chassis starts to show its road settings and the whole thing becomes dangerous unless you are a very, very skilled racing driver.

This is of course not specific to Ferrari but all these super cars seem to be increasingly tailor made for "Top Gear". Of all the people I know dreaming of Ferraris practically nobody has even sat in one, let alone driven one! The Ferrari-owning friends I have use their cars 3 - 4 times a year, seldom enough for the battery to be flat. In one case a Ferrar owner has just bought a BMW M1 coupé as "fun car" but both he and his wife say they would rather have an M1 coupé each + the new M5 than keep the Ferrari which is never used.

[/quote]

Forgive me for being a little suspicious of your account but that's nothing like the thousands of miles I've racked up in various 430s. The 430 is an incredibly comfortable car and I've done many journeys that cover much of the length of Britain and a couple covering much of Europe. The cars have offered levels of comfort not too far away from any of the luxury saloons I've done similar journeys in and rattles are, on the whole, something left behind with the 360. And the 430 makes plenty of sense at much below 140, in particular on twisty roads. And your 'Ferrari owning friends' (have a lot do you?), well, sure, there are a few owners who's only concern seems to be re-sale value and keeping the milage down. But most of the owners I know use their cars regularly. Sure, most Ferraris remain low milage, but 3 - 4 time a year? No. And no, these cars are not increasingly tailor made for Top Gear. In fact quite the opposite, they become more drivable with every generation. And more fun in a M1 coupé? Please...

I may well be wrong, but your account sounds like nothing more than the uninformed musings (complete with long since defunct half truths) of someone with a bee in his bonnet about supercars.

507

11 April 2011

No, I do not "hate supercars". Ferrari are beatifully engineered cars, in some respects to a fascinating degree. My point was though the practicallity of these vehicles and how 4 -5 of my friends who have owned several Ferraris for a number of years actually use their cars in a few major european cities. A Ferrari is obviously unsuitable for commuting in and out of London and the roads in the UK are not exactly tailor made for this kind of car. The Top Gear comment was of course made in jest.

The M1 Coupé comparison is not my own, but that of a Ferrari-owner, the vehicles are far too different to compare in my view, but it is fun to hear the ideas of people who can easily spend £ 500 000 - 900 000 on filling their garages.

For nearly everyone a Ferrari is only a dream, but in reality the "dream" might not be exactly what most people think. Having done a fair bit of track racing I might be a bit jaded as far as dreams on four wheels are concerned.

11 April 2011

I have to commend Ferrari for reducing the weight of its next car . I do wonder how effectively you can tranfer 700 bhp to potholed tarmac through 2 driven wheels .

I would rather see a much smaller and lighter car with a similar BHP per tonne . Say MX5 size . Surely it would be just as much fun in the real world . Or would smaller and lighter mean cheaper so less profitable ?

11 April 2011

[quote Old Toad]Or would smaller and lighter mean cheaper so less profitable ?[/quote] Probably more to do with the impression, statement if you like, they wish to make with their cars. Ferrari, like all these manufacturers, have a sort of manifesto that dictates what their cars must be so however they chase performance, driving thrill and X-factor, it has to happen within the set boundaries of what they deem to be a 'Ferrari'. Don't expect an MX5 size fun car anytime soon.

11 April 2011

Ferrari running scared again?, it's not power this brute needs, it's a less axe murderer if you get it slightly wrong!.

Peter Cavellini.

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